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The Vectorian Lounge => The Lounge => Topic started by: metvas on June 19, 2007, 12:31:51 pm

Title: The End Of Copyright
Post by: metvas on June 19, 2007, 12:31:51 pm
I have always maintained that, "That which is unusual eventually becomes usual"
Remembering when I started a no red meat diet in the early 80's some of my friends took great delight in ordering veal, ( they knew I would cringe at that) while we were out for dinner. Now they ask for recipes and advice. Poetic justice.
A great read, with lots of good ideas.
 http://www.gamasutra.com/features/20051128/adams_01.shtml (http://www.gamasutra.com/features/20051128/adams_01.shtml)
regards
Darrell
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: nubcnubdo on June 19, 2007, 12:46:22 pm
You gotta love basmati.
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: metvas on June 19, 2007, 08:30:15 pm
You bet, brown is best.
Darrell
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: incognu on June 19, 2007, 10:25:42 pm
Good read!

Heh, I love brown basmati too. 
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: nubcnubdo on June 19, 2007, 10:26:53 pm
Brown basmati may be better nutritionally, but white basmati is the ultimate olfactory and taste experience. The fragrance is 50% of the enjoyment of basmati. I usually buy a variety grown in Punjab.
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: retired1af on June 19, 2007, 10:30:52 pm
End of Copyright? I hightly doubt it. Copyright laws will continue to have an influence on how we operate, and how websites such as this continue to do business.


Here's a hint. Unless a site's membership gets a serious clue on how copyright infringement can criple  any site, that very same membership will be the downfall of that very same site.
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: metvas on June 19, 2007, 10:54:35 pm
Hi:
Can you please expand on your post about copyright, maybe if you can keep it simple compare to copyleft. This would be a good post to have.
Thxs
Regards
Darrell
ps. ever tried wild rice, we fortunately get a variety that is harvested by hand from the Lakeshores. The aboriginal folks harvest from a canoe while beating the rice plants with their paddles it falls in the canoe. Enough falls outside the canoe to make next years crop.
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: joec on June 20, 2007, 09:45:51 am
rice cruelty should not be condoned. is brown sugar better than white sugar? in  need to know  -- now -- my oatmeal is getting cold.
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: Triarius Fidelis on June 20, 2007, 09:57:51 am
Quote
Just 550 years ago this year, a guy named Johann Gutenberg figured out how to make large quantities of metal type in a hurry. He didn’t invent printing—the Chinese had been doing that with wooden blocks for centuries—but he did find a way to make it fast and efficient. Gutenberg changed the world and helped to bring on the Renaissance.

Incidentally, an alphabet is better suited for that task than a logographic system like Chinese. Only a few dozen characters (rather than a few thousand) characters to render, and much easier to manage as a result.

Quote
Remembering when I started a no red meat diet in the early 80's some of my friends took great delight in ordering veal, ( they knew I would cringe at that) while we were out for dinner. Now they ask for recipes and advice. Poetic justice.

Well, meat simulations are better than ever. Sometimes I want genuine beef jerky though.
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: exeterdad on June 20, 2007, 10:01:12 am
Quote
Well, meat simulations are better than ever. Sometimes I want genuine beef jerky though.

I've gotta have yummy barnyard animals.  Sorry  ;)
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: Triarius Fidelis on June 20, 2007, 10:19:53 am
You gotta love basmati.

Chettinadu Kozhi > *
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: rbistolfi on June 20, 2007, 10:21:13 am
Hindi words always sound like italian for me, like this:

- Hey bambini! Have you seen Sergio Basmati today?

 ;D

PS: I like the true cows too. sorry met, I cant live without them, but I try to eat not very much, if that helps  ;)
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: Triarius Fidelis on June 20, 2007, 10:40:51 am
Hindi words always sound like italian for me, like this:

Consider that Hindi is essentially a vulgar melting-pot language common to an area whose formal languages are Sanskrit and Pali. Latin and Greek share much in common with Sanskrit, and Italian is just lazy Latin, so there's your connection. Try checking a Hindi dictionary and you'll be amazed to see all the cognates.

But they call Telugu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telugu_language) the 'Italian of teh East' because of its (superficial) phonetic resemblance to the same.
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: rbistolfi on June 20, 2007, 11:17:23 am
Quote
Italian is just lazy Latin, so there's your connection

Indeed, Italian build words from some cases and declinations from latin. Is very interesting. In Spanish just the verbs keeps the desinense structure.
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: nubcnubdo on June 21, 2007, 12:12:09 am
Here is a good popular book I keep on the bedstand:

The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Language
http://www.cambridge.org/uk/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=0521559677

at Amazon.com
http://www.amazon.com/Cambridge-Encyclopedia-Language-David-Crystal/dp/0521559677
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: Colonel Panic on June 23, 2007, 05:35:37 am
Hindi words always sound like italian for me, like this:

Consider that Hindi is essentially a vulgar melting-pot language common to an area whose formal languages are Sanskrit and Pali. Latin and Greek share much in common with Sanskrit, and Italian is just lazy Latin, so there's your connection. Try checking a Hindi dictionary and you'll be amazed to see all the cognates.

But they call Telugu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telugu_language) the 'Italian of teh East' because of its (superficial) phonetic resemblance to the same.

Having done Latin at school, it used to amaze me that anyone could actually speak it on the fly, as it were; all the different declensions and conjugations add up to a considerable amount of mental work needed to even write a sentence of Latin, never mind speak it.

Maybe that's how the Roman Empire grew so big, all that mental exercise, but then it declined so perhaps they got lazy....
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: rbistolfi on June 23, 2007, 10:50:53 am
I am not sure, and I think nobody does, how the latin was spoken. The latin we know is written by intellectuals. The poetics forms needs an effort from the reader, I dont think was truly understood "on the fly". I guess the vulgar latin was a simplified version of the one we know.
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: Colonel Panic on June 23, 2007, 11:14:21 am
Could well be true.
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: Triarius Fidelis on June 25, 2007, 06:40:43 am
Hindi words always sound like italian for me, like this:

Consider that Hindi is essentially a vulgar melting-pot language common to an area whose formal languages are Sanskrit and Pali. Latin and Greek share much in common with Sanskrit, and Italian is just lazy Latin, so there's your connection. Try checking a Hindi dictionary and you'll be amazed to see all the cognates.

But they call Telugu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telugu_language) the 'Italian of teh East' because of its (superficial) phonetic resemblance to the same.

Having done Latin at school, it used to amaze me that anyone could actually speak it
on the fly, as it were; all the different declensions ans conjugations add up to a considerable amount of mental work needed to even write a sentence of Latin, never mind speak it.

Maybe that's how the Roman Empire grew so big, all that mental exercise, but then it declined so perhaps they got lazy....

I don't think it's that. The strict and complex grammar Old English deteriorated in similar circumstances, but only relatively small kingdoms existed in England. Many things caused the demise of the Roman Empire though.

In the military aspect, other Europeans and Hebrews began to take advantage of the Legion's stale tactics. Though able to hold territory, newer techniques such as Visigoth heavy cavalry and Jewish guerrilla warfare inflicted unsustainable damage. The Roman military were eventually forced to dispatch essential duties to a bunch of bored Saxon conscripts with beer bellies, who couldn't care less about what they did anyway. The spatha--made for defense, rather than the Spanish sword--made for killing, soon came to represent the weakened state of the Roman military.

There's more than that of course. The spread of Christianity certainly played a significant role in diverting the loyalty of many citizens from the Empire. Almost no production of material goods and lack of a middle class, among other factors, ruined the economy. Arguably even the lead plumbing and food seasoning (lead acetate) were responsible somehow; look at how bollixed up Caligula was.

They certainly left many good things behind though.
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: exeterdad on June 25, 2007, 08:11:35 am
I just love this forum.  You just never know what you are going to learn today.  :)

hanumizzle... You've got a lot of stuff in that cranium of yours.
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: rbistolfi on June 25, 2007, 09:02:49 am
To add something to hanimizzle great post, the empire got too big... There was no way to hold it.
Some Imperators saw this, like Adriano, who builded the famous wall and put limits to the expansion; against the tradition of an "empire with no limits".

I just love this forum.  You just never know what you are going to learn today.  :)

hanumizzle... You've got a lot of stuff in that cranium of yours.


Indeed.

Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: Triarius Fidelis on June 25, 2007, 09:44:54 am
To add something to hanimizzle great post, the empire got too big... There was no way to hold it.
Some Imperators saw this, like Adriano, who builded the famous wall and put limits to the expansion; against the tradition of an "empire with no limits".

(Ironically, Hadrian was from Spain.)

It's just as well that he built his famous wall. The fens and hills of the British Isles, and the fierce Celts who lived in them, turned out to be a nightmare for the Romans, and they couldn't rout the natives as long as they didn't face them on the open field, fighting for personal honor in a very disorganized way.

All told, Hadrian had a good legacy, but cracks in the facade showed by then. Remember that the Romans were also nearly pwned in the Second Jewish-Roman War under his rule, but for the fatal arrogance of the leader of the uprising, a strange Samson/Ho Chi Minh combination named Shimon Bar Kochba. He and his followers uniquely waged war through a system of passages carved in the sturdy limestone of the Holy Land, to their great benefit.

If he were able to control his hair-trigger temper, some say the Romans almost certainly would have lost.
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: rbistolfi on June 25, 2007, 11:57:53 am
Quote
If he were able to control his hair-trigger temper, some say the Romans almost certainly would have lost.

The classic topic, reason vs. passion got many chapters on hystory.

I like Hadrian, he was some kind of exentric  imperator. The latins called him "graeculum", the little greek, not in a good way.
Of course, I like more the Island people, and those beyond the Rhin River, than the big empire  :).
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: Triarius Fidelis on June 25, 2007, 12:42:06 pm
Could well be true.

Was true, and, in a sense, is true. Portuguese for example, descends from a dialect of vulgar Latin.

English is much the same. Only in English do the words 'tintinnabulation' and 'bog' coexist, owing to years of migration, growth and often upheaval. It's now somewhat hard to believe that we once used words like 'gamol' and 'niman' and 'mearh', but here it is:

Quote
Hwæt! We Gardena  in geardagum,
þeodcyninga,  þrym gefrunon,
hu ða æþelingas  ellen fremedon.
Oft Scyld Scefing  sceaþena þreatum,
monegum mægþum,  meodosetla ofteah,
egsode eorlas.  Syððan ærest wearð
feasceaft funden,  he þæs frofre gebad,
weox under wolcnum,  weorðmyndum þah,
þæt him æghwylc  þara ymbsittendra
ofer hronrade  hyran scolde,
gomban gyldan.  Þæt wæs god cyning!

I had a book on Anglo-Saxon but I know not where it has gone. I think I learned more about English grammar and composition from studying Germanic languages than English class itself.
Title: Re: The End Of Copyright
Post by: metvas on June 27, 2007, 01:46:10 am
A very good insight as to  patents . I watch the news from Asia as they are still developing and lots to learn from them.

http://www.delhiscienceforum.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=329&Itemid=2 (http://www.delhiscienceforum.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=329&Itemid=2)
Regards
Darrell