VectorLinux

The nuts and bolts => Multimedia & Games => Topic started by: Will on September 04, 2007, 07:18:03 am

Title: (solved)MU* client?
Post by: Will on September 04, 2007, 07:18:03 am
Muds, moos, mush's, ect. Basicly you can run these games from telnet. However windows has a hundred and one clients that specialize in the more entertaining aspects of telnet. What I have to ask then is, what linux naitive MU* apps are out there? I'd rather not install wine just to get my text-based gaming on.
Title: Re: MU* client?
Post by: lagagnon on September 04, 2007, 08:46:05 am
I have never used these on Linux but there are quite a few. The best resource I know of for finding Linux software that may be a bit "out of the ordinary" is http://www.freshmeat.net . If you just type "mud" into the search entry box at that site  you will find quite a few mud clients. It also picks up apps for other OS's though, so be careful. If you run SOHO there is a KMud client which would probably be best, for Standard choose something lighterweight in my opinion.
Title: Re: MU* client?
Post by: Will on September 04, 2007, 07:03:37 pm
Appreciated. Thanks. :)
Title: Re: (solved)MU* client?
Post by: Tigerwolf on September 30, 2007, 01:50:05 pm
....what linux naitive MU* apps are out there? I'd rather not install wine just to get my text-based gaming on.

The most singularly powerful classical MU* client is TinyFugue. 
 http://tinyfugue.sourceforge.net/  (http://tinyfugue.sourceforge.net/)

It compiles on virtually every machine known to mankind.   It's pure text/curses based, so will run in an xterm or on a serial dumb terminal.   It's very low bandwidth, and can be run remotely over dial-up links.   It has a full array of macros and scripting to allow almost any level of complexity and automated actions.

For a graphical interface, try Trebuchet 
http://www.belfry.com/fuzzball/trebuchet/ (http://www.belfry.com/fuzzball/trebuchet/)

Trebuchet is based on TinyFugue command syntax, but wraps a nice GUI around that.

Both these are staples on the 30 or so machines I use for doing Internet rooms at various conventions.