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Author Topic: Anyone else using Google's....  (Read 2501 times)
flip city
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Way Out In HyperSpace


« on: December 23, 2009, 08:14:02 pm »

 public DNS servers

8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4

set through your router.
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stretchedthin
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WWW
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2009, 08:56:04 pm »

Do you think you are getting faster browsing speeds?
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flip city
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« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2009, 09:37:56 pm »

 maybe there's a way to measure emperically, the speeds, when visiting say the same site, under the public (google) then the private. without that, I couldn't say, although google promises a speed improvement.
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nightflier
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« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2009, 06:23:15 am »

I've been using it for some weeks now. Can't say that I've noticed any speed difference, but seems reliable.
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rbistolfi
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« Reply #4 on: December 25, 2009, 06:54:28 am »

Is good to have choice in this matter. The DNS servers of my isp went down several times  this year.
I will append these after the Opendns IPs. BTW you can append nameservers in your /etc/resolv.conf and they will be used as needed.
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"There is a concept which corrupts and upsets all others. I refer not to Evil, whose limited realm is that of ethics; I refer to the infinite."
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gamfa
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« Reply #5 on: December 25, 2009, 08:15:43 am »

Quote
BTW you can append nameservers in your /etc/resolv.conf and they will be used as needed.

That's a handy piece of info. I had never thought about that. I'm going to go back add my isp's nameservers to the end of the Opendns servers also.
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nitehawk
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Just me.


« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2009, 10:37:45 am »

I'm just on (ugh!) dialup,...and tried out Google.   Can't really tell if there is much difference from using the OpenDNS (208.67.222.222--208.67.220.220).  It seemed to be a bit faster for awhile,...but I just went back to the OpenDNS. 
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schmatzler
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« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2009, 07:32:51 am »

OpenDNS seems to be the same like Googles Servers, without redirecting to Google if a webpage doesn't exist.

But both are better than the DNS servers from my ISP - crappy AOL search pops up then.  Roll Eyes
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flip city
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« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2010, 01:06:42 pm »

Do you think you are getting faster browsing speeds?

Here are some empirical results that may answer the question Is google DNS faster ?

Is Google DNS faster?
Google claims that its DNS service is faster than others, so I tested by running the nslookup command at the command line in a simple batch file that also displays start and finish times to see how long it takes to complete using a specified DNS server's address. I tested on a PC located in New York City using Verizon as the ISP.

The differences are in tenths and hundredths of a second, but over the course of a day's Web surfing, that can add up, especially for sites that require multiple DNS lookups. I noticed that more obscure sites, such as www.atomische.com, took longer than popular sites on the first try—since the DNS server being used would have to fetch the IP address from another authoritative server the first time, and after that, my chosen DNS server would usually have cached the address, making subsequent lookups much quicker. Strangely, after this first lookup, the more obscure sites actually were faster than the popular ones.

Here are my results:

Regular ISP Connected Machine (Seconds to URL lookup)
Site                            Default DNS    Google DNS    OpenDNS
www.ebay.com            0.12                     0.09                    0.09
www.pcmag.com    0.25                     0.12              0.14
www.gearlog.com    0.31                   0.15             0.16
www.atomische.com    0.11                     0.54            0.07
www.thesportscircuit.com 0.11             0.24                    0.04
www.brillianttees.net    0.26                     0.31                    0.20
www.brillianttees.net    0.26                     0.31                    0.20
Average                    0.19                     0.24             0.12

Another way to check speed is to use FastNext.com's DNS timing test. I tested this with my three DNS server on several sites as well, and the differences were even less significant than my test with nslookup:

Fastnext (ms)           Google    ISP        OpenDNS
radiouslerand.com    91            91          90
races.com                    90            94          91
adobe.com                    86            82          80
blippr.com                    81            79          80
cooliris.com            61            58          58
purpletrail.com            45            45          45
Average                  75.67          74.83        74.00

I can't imagine the vast majority of users will bother changing their DNS settings, or even know what they are—unless of course they're peeved by their ISP hijacking "not found" pages with unwanted search results. That's one nice, if minor, benefit of Google DNS.

As far as the privacy of your surfing habits goes, either you trust that Google is doing what it says it is or you don't. Overall, I don't see speed as a reason to switch to Google DNS, as local ISP DNS servers will usually be adequate, and OpenDNS is marginally faster than either. Still, if you're given to tweaking your computer and suspect that you're not getting all the speed you could (and who doesn't, sometimes) you might want to point to a different DNS server. Personally, I'd recommend OpenDNS, based on my tests. If you do change DNS servers, let us know about your experiences in the comments section of this story.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2010, 01:13:54 pm by flip city » Logged

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