VectorLinux
December 20, 2014, 01:22:11 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Visit our home page for VL info. To search the old message board go to http://vectorlinux.com/forum1. The first VL forum is temporarily offline until we can find a host for it. Thanks for your patience.
 
Now powered by KnowledgeDex.
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Please support VectorLinux!
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: grsync question  (Read 3040 times)
sledgehammer
Vectorian
****
Posts: 1430



« on: February 02, 2010, 05:52:46 am »

When using "grysync backup tool (root)" from the system menu, and accepting defaults, is it best to create a new destination file each time I backup, or to just keep the old destination file? 

Thx

John

Logged

VL7.0 xfce4 Samsung RF511
toothandnail
Tester
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2527


« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2010, 02:48:40 pm »

Keeping the old destination file/directory will minimize overhead, since it will only backup changed data. Creating a new destination file/directory will force Grsync to recreate the entire backup each time.

Smiley One of the big advantages of rsync is its ability to save only changed data, though you do need to be careful if backing up to a Windows share - you may find that rsync becomes confused and repeats the backup over and over again. This is due to insufficient granularity in Windows stored time stamp data.

HTH

Paul.
Logged
sledgehammer
Vectorian
****
Posts: 1430



« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2010, 07:58:04 pm »

Thanks.

So, do you think that if I got an external hard drive, I could have grsync set to continually back up a server's home directory to the external hard drive?  Like having it running 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

John
Logged

VL7.0 xfce4 Samsung RF511
bigpaws
Vectorian
****
Posts: 1862


« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2010, 09:21:10 pm »

grsync is a Gui for rsync.

This tool is great for synchronizing directories or files. You can use grsync
for an external drive without any problems. If the mount point is not
constant you can edit udev rules so that every time you mount the
drive it will mount in the same location and name.

You can run grsync as much as you want, be aware of file locking.

Bigpaws
Logged
sledgehammer
Vectorian
****
Posts: 1430



« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2010, 11:59:49 pm »

Thanks.

So, if you have time to respond further, what to do if I don't want to worry about file locking, and still be sure that data is not lost if the server goes down? I suspect there is no safe harbor here. 

Right now I am relying on stand-alone computers and a weekly backup.  But if I network, and I am thinking more and more about doing that, the server will have to be pretty fool-proof. 

John
Logged

VL7.0 xfce4 Samsung RF511
nightflier
Administrator
Vectorian
*****
Posts: 4038



« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2010, 05:04:15 am »

I've been running a server on my network for years. It's the way to go. Simple bash scripts called from cron use rsync to back up on a schedule. The most important data is duplicated on separate hard drives. The scripts also mail me a report when done so I always know what it's doing.

File locking on Windows machines can be a pain. I managed to work around that by using a combination of shadow copy and robocopy in a batch file run from the task scheduler.

I'd be happy to share these scripts if you decide to go with this kind of solution.
Logged
bigpaws
Vectorian
****
Posts: 1862


« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2010, 08:47:24 am »

The best way to avoid file locking (which can be a good thing) is to make sure the files
are closed during backup. This is not always possible, so I try to make a time in which
I could be sure that the files will not be locked. You could schedule a backup several times
a day and then at night schedule the last one, when you believe all files are closed.

On my servers I use the above situation.

Nightfliers solution maybe a better solution depending on need, and definitely worth looking into.

HTH

Bigpaws
Logged
toothandnail
Tester
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2527


« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2010, 03:43:25 pm »

Grsync can be used to generate scripts which can then be run from the command line. Another alternative is to have a look at synbak - I'll have to check, but I think the package should still be in the repos. It can use rsync along with a number of other options. Takes a little bit of work with an editor to set it up, but it can then easily be added to cron events to automate the backup.

I built snybak because I had need of a backup package for a number of servers that I maintain - in one instance, it is handling the backup of a 70 GB+ file server, backing up to a NAS unit.

If you want some examples of using it to removable or network drives, let me know - I use it with my own machines as well. It is better suited to automatic backups than something like Grsync.

Paul.
Logged
sledgehammer
Vectorian
****
Posts: 1430



« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2010, 02:07:27 am »

I just did my Sunday night backup.  Grsync is great!  Backing up (overwriting) my home directory to the backup directory on my reformated linux external hard drive took only 10 minutes.  Compared to several hours when I back up to an empty directory.  I have not received a "completed with errors" message since formatting the external to linux. I still think I will do a "fresh" new backup every couple of months, but for regular backup, this is cool.

« Last Edit: March 08, 2010, 02:09:35 am by sledgehammer » Logged

VL7.0 xfce4 Samsung RF511
toothandnail
Tester
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2527


« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2010, 03:07:21 am »

I just did my Sunday night backup.  Grsync is great!  Backing up (overwriting) my home directory to the backup directory on my reformated linux external hard drive took only 10 minutes.  Compared to several hours when I back up to an empty directory.  I have not received a "completed with errors" message since formatting the external to linux. I still think I will do a "fresh" new backup every couple of months, but for regular backup, this is cool.

Glad its working.

If I remember correctly, you have two external drives? If so, why not rotate them and have two backup sets? I've been doing that for a while (ever since a serious power glitch took out the hard drive in a machine, and the backup drive which was in use when the glitch hit  Angry ).

It is still worth 'refreshing' the backup completely every once in a while, but with two copies, you have a much better chance of getting the data you need back in case of a problem.

Paul.
Logged
sledgehammer
Vectorian
****
Posts: 1430



« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2010, 09:41:30 am »

Good idea.  I will try it.

Now, I am going to get some large usb sticks and slowly get the office to do grsync backups.  Right now, its hit or miss. Miss is bad.





Logged

VL7.0 xfce4 Samsung RF511
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!