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Author Topic: adding 2nd hard drive user problem  (Read 877 times)
franklin1k
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Posts: 55


« on: March 11, 2010, 12:34:20 pm »

Running VL6 KDE classic

I added a second hard drive.  It mounts right enough.  The permissions are set for root. 
So, this line in fstab was;

/dev/hdb1   /mnt/hdb1  reiserfs noatime, 0 2
modified to;

/dev/hdb1   /mnt/hdb1  reiserfs rw, user, noatime, 0 2

so as to let users to use.

Id did not have the desired effect.

What did I miss?
and/or
Using VasmCC, mounting, what do I add to the options popup?

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GrannyGeek
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Posts: 2567


« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2010, 02:15:11 pm »

You have spaces in
rw, user, noatime,
that I don't think should be there. Remove the spaces and try again.

This is purely a guess, so I might have it all wrong. However, you won't hurt anything by removing the spaces. I think that part of the fstab line should be
rw,user,noatime

Let us know.

>> Using VasmCC, mounting, what do I add to the options popup? >>

I don't have anything to mount, so this is from memory. After the screen that asks what partition to mount, the next one comes up with suggested options, in your case probably
noatime

To change or add, just type them in after (or instead of) the option already there:
noatime,rw, user

Then continue. Note there are no spaces.
--GrannyGeek

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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
franklin1k
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Posts: 55


« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2010, 04:36:10 pm »

Nope, I tried both ways.

Perhaps I am being dense about how permissions work.
When the 2nd hd was added its owner is root.  As is its group.
The only way to write to it is to allow "others" permission to write to it.
This seems like a security risk if I have file sharing turned on on this disk.

would it not be better to allow just users to write to the disk?  Or, have I watch too much Lost and the word others sends a shiver doen my spine, huh.
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retired1af
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« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2010, 04:40:16 pm »

Once you allow access to the disk, you then create permissions for the actual directory structure and file system (using chmod). This is where you can be lenient or strict on permissions, such as read, write and execute. But you need to allow everyone access to the disk in order for it to happen.
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ASUS K73 Intel i3 Dual Core 2.3GHz
nightflier
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« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2010, 04:58:29 pm »

Have you tried running vasm > super > filesystem > mount ?
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franklin1k
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Posts: 55


« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2010, 05:30:11 pm »

I can now write to the HD

As root, using File Manager - Super User> HD > properties > permissions, enabling "others" to read and write.
This should be secure enough as long as file sharing is not enabled on this HD, right?

Using vasm or vasmCC I have been unable to either change ownership or add user to the group.  This might not be available through these programs.  My understanding was that ownership could be changed while mounting a drive. 

My knowledge of chmod ranks with my ability to sprout wings.  If you could enlighten me on either, thanks.  I have always used the GUI over CLI because of my Windows upbringing.
 
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GrannyGeek
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« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2010, 05:33:15 pm »

I'm no expert on the options for mounting partitions, but this is how I understand it.

By default, only root can mount a file system (partition). If you use the user option, that means any user can mount the file system, not just root. Once a file system is mounted, I *think* any user can have access to it. However, the access depends on permissions in the file system itself. If the user option is used in fstab, only root and that user can unmount the file system.

If instead of user you put the users option in fstab, any user can mount the drive and any user can unmount the drive. Contrast that with user, where only root and the user who mounted the drive can unmount it. So
user=only root and the user who mounted the drive can unmount it
users=root and *any* user can unmount the drive

In VL6 on all my systems, if the file system on the drive to be mounted is ntfs-3g, only root can mount the drive regardless of whether user or users is in fstab. Once the ntfs-3g drive is mounted, any user can read it and write to it. But for reiserfs or ext3, any user can mount a drive if user is an option in fstab.

I'm usually the only user, so I haven't worried about security on the drives to which users have access. I have a visitor account set up for the rare times someone else will be using my computer. If someone else will be using it, I unmount the other file systems before the visitor logs in. While they could theoretically mount these partitions, they don't know how, wouldn't even think of it, don't know other partitions exist, and have no malicious intent. In a different environment I'd have to find out more about how to make sure nobody could do something I don't want on other mounted file systems.

There is a LOT of very technical and mostly incomprehensible (to me) information on option in
man mount

You may want to take a look through it. Also check out
man fstab.
--GrannyGeek
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Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
franklin1k
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Posts: 55


« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2010, 08:59:00 am »

Thanks

Yeal, reading mount man and googling  either hurts my head or puts me to sleep.  You did clear up a few pionts for me.  I believe the security solution for me is to run IPCop on an old computer, then run the firewall/router to keep people where they belong.  Not all nodes are created equally that way.

As for the second hard drive, it works that way and no other has raised an alarm by my opening the permissions to "other".  I do believe that ownership can be changed with the mount command.  If you fail enough in Linux you learn.

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