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Author Topic: How do I install vector?  (Read 3714 times)
1984
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« on: March 18, 2010, 10:22:10 am »

I just clicked on the download link to install Vector Standard gold. I am currently running Windows XP. I have never used any version of Linux before. I finished installing it from the website and my goal is to be able to do duel boot as this is a family computer and I don't want to screw anyones stuff up.

My question is how do I get vector? All I have now are a bunch of folders and files that I downloaded from the site. How do I start the install? what do I do now?  Huh
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Daniel
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« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2010, 10:46:00 am »

When you clicked on the download link, you should have downloaded a .iso file. To install VectorLinux, you will have to burn that .iso file to a cd. Make sure you burn it as an image and not just data. Then you need to boot your computer off of the cd to start the installation.

There are some video tutorials here: http://www.opensourcebistro.com/Tutorial/VL60/01.Installation/page
to guide you through the process.
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VL 6.0 SOHO KDE-Classic on 2.3 Ghz Dual-core AMD with 3 Gigs of RAM
newt
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« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2010, 10:51:37 am »

This sounds like a recipe for disaster - playing around with something powerful on a shared family system and lacking knowledge.

My recommendation would be to simply install VirtualBox for Windows (a free virtual machine software), and play around with distro installation within the protected environment of a virtual machine.  This method will leave your families system alone and in-tact, while giving you a playground to experience linux.  Once you've become introduced to linux and have gained some knowledge of dual-booting/etc then you can attempt a real (hardware-based) installation.  You can even attempt the dual-boot scenario directly in the virtual machine to see the outcome.  Keep in mind, this method basically created a "machine within a machine" - in other words, you'll have a virtual machine running from within Windows.

VirtualBox download: http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads
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retired1af
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« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2010, 11:18:25 am »

This sounds like a recipe for disaster - playing around with something powerful on a shared family system and lacking knowledge.

Speaking from experience, yep! When I first started to fiddle around with personal Linux distributions back in 2004, I managed to not only bork up my Windows XP installation, I also managed to wipe out about 5 years worth of data and information along with it. And I've been playing with PCs since the early days of Zenith 100s!

Before attempting ANY installation to the hard drive, make sure that everything is backed up. Especially the stuff that will result in the family not only disowning you, but taking you out front and turning you into a live effigy and burning you at the stake.  Grin
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ASUS K73 Intel i3 Dual Core 2.3GHz
1984
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« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2010, 12:54:49 pm »

Thank you every one. I'll fool around with virtual box first and try to see what I can do. Try to find someone who knows what their doing. I do have a question about vector though. Seeings how vector isn't one of the most know versions of linux. I've been checking out a lot of sources of free software online before I convert and I noticed that very few of them offer downloads specifically for vector. Case in point. http://easytag.sourceforge.net/ click on downloads.

Since Vector is based on slackware will any program that will work with slackware work with vector? And why are there so many download options if they're all linux?
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Daniel
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« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2010, 01:07:46 pm »

VectorLinux uses a package manager called Gslapt. It lets you download and install packages (software) from the VectorLinux repositories. Software (such as the stuff on Sourceforge) gets packaged and put in the repository. The download options you see are probably either precompiled binaries of programs that you can just download and run or source files which have to be compiled before they can be run/installed. The packages in the repository are the compiled source. Gslapt makes it very easy to download and install this software.
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VL 6.0 SOHO KDE-Classic on 2.3 Ghz Dual-core AMD with 3 Gigs of RAM
GrannyGeek
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« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2010, 05:42:45 pm »

Easytag is all ready for you to download and install from the VectorLinux repositories.

You can often install a Slackware package for a program you want that is not in the VL repos, but you have to understand that you are taking a risk, usually slight, of messing something up on your computer because Vector is based on Slackware but not identical to it. When you're first starting to use VL it's probably wisest to limit yourself to packages in the VL repos. You can branch out when you get more experienced.

>> And why are there so many download options if they're all linux? >>

Different Linux distros use different package management systems. Strictly speaking, "Linux" is just the kernel. Distros include a set of Gnu utilities and programs and whatever other programs a distro chooses to include. Most distros have a default graphical interface and may include other GUIs. For VectorLinux Light the default GUI is IceWM; for VL Standard the default GUI is XFce; for SOHO the default GUI is KDE. So although all the distros are Linux, they can have many differences.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
nightflier
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« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2010, 06:41:25 pm »

For beginners, one of the safest and easiest ways to try Linux is "wubi": http://wubi-installer.org/
It installs and uninstalls like a Windows program. No hard drive partitioning involved.
You should have at least 20 GB of free space and a Gig of memory to go this route.
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GrannyGeek
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« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2010, 08:00:34 pm »

For beginners, one of the safest and easiest ways to try Linux is "wubi": http://wubi-installer.org/
It installs and uninstalls like a Windows program. No hard drive partitioning involved.
You should have at least 20 GB of free space and a Gig of memory to go this route.

That's just for Ubuntu, isn't it? I hate to steer yet another potential user to Ubuntu.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
sledgehammer
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« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2010, 10:42:12 pm »

I think it probably best if you get a used machine for $100 or so and install VL 6 on it, without dual booting.  Then you can play around with it to your heart's desire, without screwing anything up.
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nightflier
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« Reply #10 on: March 19, 2010, 04:07:30 am »

That's just for Ubuntu, isn't it?

Correct. I give Ubuntu credit where credit is due. For windows users with only one machine, wubi seems the easiest and safest alternative.

Of course, I agree with Sledgehammer. Get a dedicated machine for experimentation. That is by far the best approach.
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1984
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« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2010, 05:38:47 am »

OK I have another question. Whenever i try to download vector (not install) I do not get an Iso image icon like in the video. What I get is files and folders scatterd everywhere. When I am on my college computer I do get a single icon that says iso image file. But on my college computer I am unable to download the ISO recorder to put it on disk due to administrative priviliges that I cannot change.

What is wrong with my home computer that I can't download it properly and how do I fix it? I want to download the live version to at least see what its like.
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retired1af
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« Reply #12 on: March 19, 2010, 05:55:01 am »

Are you just clicking on the link and letting the PC do the rest, or did you right click on the link and select "Save As"?
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ASUS K73 Intel i3 Dual Core 2.3GHz
GrannyGeek
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« Reply #13 on: March 19, 2010, 09:06:43 pm »

While I agree that using a dedicated machine for one's Linux adventures is a safer option, I'm uneasy with the implications. Essentially, it's saying "if you want to try out Linux, a free-as-in-beer operating system, it's best to buy another computer for this." Even at $100 or less, it's still money, to say nothing of finding the room for another computer. In the time it would take to shop for and set up a used computer, a user could learn how to dual boot with Windows safely.

I've been using Linux since maybe 1999. I've never had a dedicated Linux computer and have always dual booted with Windows. I've *never* trashed a Windows partition or lost any data while using Linux. I am not an expert in any way. My approach has always been to learn what I needed to know in order to do what I wanted to do and not go beyond that. "Use it or lose it" is true when it comes to computers. If you learn something you won't be using, chances are very high that you'll forget it. I learned how to partition a drive long before I ever heard of Linux. I've always been well backed up, going back to the PC Tools Backup on floppy disks in the DOS days. With good backups you need never fear losing data or trashing a system. If things go bad, simply restore your system. Image files are particularly desirable--essential, really, for easy recovery in case things go wrong. Seagate and Maxtor drives come with an OEM version of Acronis TrueImage, which I use for system backups.

A few things I'd recommend for safely having Windows and Linux on the same computer or same drive:
** Don't put a Linux boot loader in the MBR. Use LILO on a floppy disk if your computer has a floppy drive. If not and you're using XP, put the MBR in the boot sector of your Linux partition and use the XP boot loader to chainload to LILO on the Linux partition. Or simply boot with the VectorLinux installation CD. It's not much extra work to boot with the VL CD.

**  Don't autoload a Windows partition, particularly not an NTFS partition, until you know what you're doing.

**  Don't autoload partitions for other Linux installations until you know what you're doing. You can make a mess of ownership and permissions if UserIDs and GroupIDs don't match up between installations.

**  For maximum safety, act as if the Windows partitions and other Linux partitions don't exist. If you don't mount these "alien" drives, your VectorLinux won't know they exist for all practical purposes.

These aren't "forever" rules, but until you know what you're doing they'll keep your Windows data safe from newbie mistakes.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
nightflier
Administrator
Vectorian
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Posts: 4018



« Reply #14 on: March 20, 2010, 05:26:19 am »

Of course we are erring on the side of caution by suggesting that people who are brand new to this use a dedicated computer. I would not say go buy one, but if you find a free discard, grab it.

Granny gives good advice. Still; partitioning, formatting, altering boot loaders, even performing backup and restore puts you into the advanced Windows user category. Granny has never had a virus on any of her Windows computers, which puts her in the Elite group.  Wink

There is another option that I want to throw out there. If you are comfortable opening the box and installing another hard drive, this would upgrade your computer with more storage space and give you added flexibility. Yes, there is risk involved here too, but balanced by potential rewards. You could start by having only the new drive plugged in and installing to it. Put the cable on old one for Windows. When ready, hook up both and set up dual boot.

You have many options. We voice our opinions and you pick the solution which suits you best.
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