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Author Topic: Native filesystem  (Read 1157 times)
dreamerman
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Posts: 10


« on: August 29, 2010, 04:38:46 pm »

Hi from a newbie. I am confused which filesystem to use with VL Light 6. Reiserf is the first on the list during installation, does that mean that is the best choice? I am after a stable & proven filesystem as I am trying out Linux after being a micro$oft addict for eons.
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Ralph_Ellis
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Posts: 27


« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2010, 04:51:14 pm »

Reiserfs is a stable and reasonably fast file system with journaling.  It is a good choice especially for file systems with many small files. The only drawback that I have seen is that if you had many disk crashes due to power failures, the recovery tools are not as advanced as some other file systems. All in all though, Resiserfs is a solid and stable choice.
If you have many large files, i.e. 600MB plus, XFS is a faster choice. XFS handles large files very well and small files not nearly as well. It is an advanced and stable 64 bit file system. If you want to boot from an XFS file system, you should use Lilo and not GRUB. GRUB and XFS as a root file system do not get along.
Ext2 is not a journaled file system and you should not use it.
Ext3 is a journaled file system and while slower than Reiserfs or XFS, it is quite stable.
Ext4 is not an option with VL Lite but if you were using SOHO, it would be an option and overall a better choice than everything else here except XFS.

Hope this helps. If you have no particular preference and do not have large video files, I would go for Reiserfs.
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RonB
Vectorite
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Posts: 120


« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2010, 04:53:06 pm »

Hi from a newbie. I am confused which filesystem to use with VL Light 6. Reiserf is the first on the list during installation, does that mean that is the best choice? I am after a stable & proven filesystem as I am trying out Linux after being a micro$oft addict for eons.

I always choose ext3, since it's well tested and a lot of the other distributions use it -- though I guess some are going to ext4 now.
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RonB
Registered Linux User #498581
Vector Linux Deluxe 6.0 -- Optiplex GX270
dreamerman
Member
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Posts: 10


« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2010, 04:57:40 pm »

Ralph, thanks. I think I will use reiserfs after much reading & your post. I am using VL6Light on a test machine & won't have any large files on it. My choice was between ext3 & reiserfs. I am amazed at choices available to Linux users. Under M$, there is only one choice - ntfs. FAT is gone as far as hdd is concerned. Thanks plenty.
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roarde
Vectorian
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Posts: 519


move the needle


« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2010, 05:25:01 pm »

For people and computers new to linux, it's ext3. I use reiser, but mainly because I've run across it before. Just habit.

Occasionally, new things come along that won't work with reiser, bootloader revisions especially. Those things are repaired for reiser later on, but it can take a while. Ext 3 is the old, proven ext2 with journaling added.

But:
If you've already installed resier and done even a little configuration, it's not worth the time to undo it. Press on, have fun.

Before you get too far, a newbie might get further faster with VL standard. VL Light is good, but requires much more caution when updating or adding packages, and there's more to learn. Much is done by hand-editing rather than auto-configure. Like my reason for reiser, I run light because I tried it first. Wish I'd started with standard, but I have too much configured to switch right now. If you're liking IceWM, just run it on standard. Light's a bit faster than standard, but standard is still faster than pretty much anything else you've seen. Also, more of the discussion here is geared to standard, though info for light is easy enough to get if you specify light in your post.

On the other hand, if you want to learn a lot of linux fast, or just prefer to jump into a bit deeper water, light would be your choice. If that's the case, glad to hear it. Every user's experience, especially from new users, helps.
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Robert
VL STD 7.1 RC2.2.2, icewmvmods
dreamerman
Member
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Posts: 10


« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2010, 05:42:48 pm »

For people and computers new to linux, it's ext3. I use reiser, but mainly because I've run across it before. Just habit.
I am using Light just because my specs are low (hp Vectra vei8 Pentium III 550Mhz, 512MB RAM, DVDROM, 20G/8.4G hdds, onboard Matrox video & Crystal sound) but I suppose I can still use Standard since it needed Pentium III & 128 RAM. I guess I will try out both filesystems for fun. Thanks.
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GrannyGeek
Packager
Vectorian
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Posts: 2567


« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2010, 06:25:48 pm »

My opinion is a bit different on these things. For file systems, don't worry about it. I'd go for ext3 or reiserfs because they've been around a long time, are stable, and are well supported in third-party tools (for example, Partition Commander, which can reliably resize all Windows file systems, ext2, ext3, and reiserfs Linux file systems). Few users would notice any speed differences no matter what Linux file system they use.

Light is great for both low-end computers and high-end computers. You can build a very customized system on Light. Standard is my favorite, but I have VL6 Light on two aged laptops and they run extremely well with Light. It's a bit harder to configure because you do it through easy-to-edit text files, whereas Standard has XFce's very nice graphical configuration tools. But Light comes with a njcely setup IceWM and you can use it right out of the box and can skip editing the text files unless you want to change or add things. I've never noticed that Light "requires much more caution when updating or adding packages," as sixforty stated. I've added all kinds of packages, both from the VectorLinux repo and third party stuff like Adobe Reader, RealPlayer, Picasa, and SoftMaker Office, and nothing bad has happened, nor was I exercising more caution.

With VectorLinux you really can't go wrong no matter what file system, desktop environment, or window manager you choose. As you've noticed, you have a lot more choices than you get with Windows. Another nice thing about VectorLinux is that it takes much less time to install or reinstall than Windows does. So if you decide you made a horrible mistake with your choices, you can just back up your personal data, reformat the partition and start over. Example: today I installed VL6 SOHO Final on my faster desktop.I started in the early afternoon and by 6 p.m. my system was complete, including the third-party programs I use and all my data restored. On Windows it would take me weeks to get everything installed or restored (not working steady on nothing but installing, but adding things as needed).
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
dreamerman
Member
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Posts: 10


« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2010, 06:55:42 pm »

GrannyGeek, thanks. You are right, I should start with the Std version instead of Light. Have been a pure M$ user & not handy with command lines. Will install STD tonite.
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GrannyGeek
Packager
Vectorian
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Posts: 2567


« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2010, 08:33:13 pm »

I didn't suggest you use Standard instead of Light. I think Light is better suited to your hardware. You don't have to use the command line a lot in Light--not really any more than you would with Standard. Configuring IceWM involves using a *text editor*, not a command line, and IceWM comes with a graphical text editor called Leafpad. You have VectorLinux's very useful system configuration tool called VASM and the graphical package installer called GSlapt. Those take care of most of what you might use a command line for.

If you've already replaced Light with Standard, see if you're happy with performance. I hope you will be.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
dreamerman
Member
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Posts: 10


« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2010, 09:05:24 pm »

Granny, understood. I think I will start with Std as my specs should be ok provided I am realistic with my expectations. Once I am happy with look & feel of Std, then I move on to Light as I think Light is more involved. Oh BTW, I wonder if you could give me your opinion on my below post regarding hdds. Cheers mate!

http://forum.vectorlinux.com/index.php?topic=12273.0
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Deach
Vectorite
***
Posts: 168


« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2010, 09:17:33 pm »

If you have realistic expectations, you'll love standard on your older machine.  I'm running it on the 600 mhz inspiron 4000 and have no qualms what so ever.  Just do not expect to watch a bunch of flash videos on the thing.....600 is pretty slow no matter which OS you go with.  Good Luck!

Deach
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Inspiron 4000 Laptop, VL 6.0  600 mhz; 384 ram : Inspiron1100 VL 6.0
Inspiron B120 & B130 Laptop, VL 6.0  1. 4& 1.5  ghz; 1gig ram
IBM Thinkpad Laptop, VL 6.0  1.5 ghz;  1 gig ram
GrannyGeek
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2567


« Reply #11 on: August 30, 2010, 08:35:14 pm »

BTW, I wonder if you could give me your opinion on my below post regarding hdds. Cheers mate!

http://forum.vectorlinux.com/index.php?topic=12273.0

Your hdd scheme makes sense. I might be inclined to use the smaller drive for / and the larger drive for /home. It depends on how much data you expect to have. If you'll be keeping photos, music, and video in your home directory, you may find 8 gigs fill up pretty rapidly.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
dreamerman
Member
*
Posts: 10


« Reply #12 on: August 30, 2010, 09:21:40 pm »

GrannyGeek, thanks. The hdb is older & only ATA66 while the hda is newer & ATA100. I thought ATA100 will be faster than ATA66 & more suited for the OS. Seems to make sense at the time, what is your opinion?
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