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Author Topic: Firefox "upgraded" to 3.0.6?  (Read 2598 times)
RonB
Vectorite
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Posts: 120


« on: September 04, 2010, 04:49:50 pm »

Strange. The update (or upgrade?) notification came up in the panel, so I let Gslapt "update" -- now I've reverted back to Firefox 3.0.6? (I was at 3.6.Cool Did I somehow go into a time warp? There  were several other files that also upgraded -- now I'm wondering if they also reverted.

Is there something I can do to make sure I'm back to the newest release and updates?

Thanks.
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RonB
Registered Linux User #498581
Vector Linux Deluxe 6.0 -- Optiplex GX270
retired1af
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Vectorian
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Posts: 1220



« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2010, 04:51:25 pm »

There are some naming issues right now with some of the packages in the repo. One should look carefully before updating via GSlapt. Doing a whole scale upgrade is a good way of breaking some things.
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RonB
Vectorite
***
Posts: 120


« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2010, 05:26:31 pm »

There are some naming issues right now with some of the packages in the repo. One should look carefully before updating via GSlapt. Doing a whole scale upgrade is a good way of breaking some things.

I normally just open GSlapt and update manually. I think this is the first time I remember getting a notification and using it. So is this different -- was it an "upgrade" instead of an "update" that I allowed? And how do I fix it? I don't even see firefox 3.6.8 available in the repository. I see 3.6.8 language packs but not firefox 3.6.8 itself.

Thanks for responding to my last message.
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RonB
Registered Linux User #498581
Vector Linux Deluxe 6.0 -- Optiplex GX270
retired1af
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 1220



« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2010, 05:33:18 pm »

You may need to enable the testing portion of the repo to find 3.6.8.
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ASUS K73 Intel i3 Dual Core 2.3GHz
sledgehammer
Vectorian
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Posts: 1397



« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2010, 05:41:09 pm »

I have 3.6.8 but for the life of me can't recall what I did to get it.  I normally use gslapt.

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RonB
Vectorite
***
Posts: 120


« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2010, 06:07:54 pm »

You may need to enable the testing portion of the repo to find 3.6.8.

It just came up with my first group of updates when I reinstalled VectorLinux a couple weeks ago. The 3.6.8 language packs are still in the repository -- so I think Firefox 3.6.8 somehow got deleted from the repository. I'm not sure what else would be affected so, for now, I'll just keep it as is.

Thanks.
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RonB
Registered Linux User #498581
Vector Linux Deluxe 6.0 -- Optiplex GX270
RonB
Vectorite
***
Posts: 120


« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2010, 06:12:13 pm »

I have 3.6.8 but for the life of me can't recall what I did to get it.  I normally use gslapt.

Yep, that's all I did. Just an update in GSlapt right after I reinstalled VectorLinux this last time. I stick pretty much  with the repositories, except when an update is required (as in Flash and Hulu). Or, with Google Chrome, when I want to download a program that's not available in the repository. I think those two are only ones that did not come from the repository.

Thanks.
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RonB
Registered Linux User #498581
Vector Linux Deluxe 6.0 -- Optiplex GX270
Andy Price
Packager
Vectorite
****
Posts: 237


« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2010, 06:16:16 pm »

Generally, for things such as Firefox where "upgrade" reverts to an older version, you can scan the list in gslapt to find the latest version and then click Install. When you click Execute you'll see that it says upgrade in the summary box and correctly identifies the version you are upgrading from. That's been my experience anyway.
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RonB
Vectorite
***
Posts: 120


« Reply #8 on: September 04, 2010, 06:36:59 pm »

Generally, for things such as Firefox where "upgrade" reverts to an older version, you can scan the list in gslapt to find the latest version and then click Install. When you click Execute you'll see that it says upgrade in the summary box and correctly identifies the version you are upgrading from. That's been my experience anyway.

I understand that, it's just that Firefox 3.6.8 isn't currently in the repositories -- which, I'm guessing, is why I reverted back to 3.0.6, when VectorLinux updated (or upgraded). There are probably forty language packs for Firefox 3.6.8, but no Firefox 3.6.8 itself. The only other firefox (other than 3.06) in the repository is "mozilla-firefox" 2.0.0.14 (or some number near that).

Under sources I have "packages," "extra," "patches" and "gsb-2.22" checked. This, I believe, was the default. What's "gsb-2.22?"

Again, thanks for all the responses.
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RonB
Registered Linux User #498581
Vector Linux Deluxe 6.0 -- Optiplex GX270
GrannyGeek
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2567


« Reply #9 on: September 04, 2010, 07:14:26 pm »

We must live on different planets. I just now updated my packages list with Gslapt and it tells me firefox 3.6.8 is in http://vectorlinux.osuosl.org/veclinux-6.0/patches/ .

If you can't find something in the regular repos, you should enable the /testing repository. People seem to miss that all the time. I emphatically do not agree that you should not have /testing enabled. Just PAY ATTENTION to where an update would be coming from! In Gslapt the Common tab lists the source of the package under Source. If something is coming from /testing, just determine if you are willing to install a package that hasn't made it into the regular repos yet. Most of the time everything is okay, but they're in /testing because they're still being, well, *tested*. I do agree that I would never, ever do a general update of all upgradeable packages with /testing enabled. In fact, I never, ever do a general update anyway.

gsb-2.22 contains gnome things that are needed by some packages. Usually they are needed as dependencies.
--GrannyGeek
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RonB
Vectorite
***
Posts: 120


« Reply #10 on: September 04, 2010, 07:29:42 pm »

We must live on different planets. I just now updated my packages list with Gslapt and it tells me firefox 3.6.8 is in http://vectorlinux.osuosl.org/veclinux-6.0/patches/ .

Shouldn't it show up in GSlapt then?

Quote
If you can't find something in the regular repos, you should enable the /testing repository. People seem to miss that all the time. I emphatically do not agree that you should not have /testing enabled. Just PAY ATTENTION to where an update would be coming from! In Gslapt the Common tab lists the source of the package under Source. If something is coming from /testing, just determine if you are willing to install a package that hasn't made it into the regular repos yet. Most of the time everything is okay, but they're in /testing because they're still being, well, *tested*. I do agree that I would never, ever do a general update of all upgradeable packages with /testing enabled. In fact, I never, ever do a general update anyway.

I kind of like "trailing edge" and stability more than "bleeding edge," and the newest available package. I guess it it comes from Debian, but when I tested that distribution I always used the stable version. I kind of avoid Ubuntu and its many derivatives specifically because it uses the "testing" branch. Probably the terminology is different in Slackware. But I'm still reluctant to add "testing" to my repository. But mostly I've just gone with the default. And, I'm used to doing regular full updates in CentOS -- but maybe that's not the best way to way to go in Slackware/VectorLinux. I obviously need to learn more.

Quote
gsb-2.22 contains gnome things that are needed by some packages. Usually they are needed as dependencies.

Thanks. Wondered what that was. So it's Gnome 2.22.
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RonB
Registered Linux User #498581
Vector Linux Deluxe 6.0 -- Optiplex GX270
RonB
Vectorite
***
Posts: 120


« Reply #11 on: September 04, 2010, 07:32:24 pm »

We must live on different planets. I just now updated my packages list with Gslapt and it tells me firefox 3.6.8 is in http://vectorlinux.osuosl.org/veclinux-6.0/patches/ .

I know sometimes that yum (in CentOS) gets out of sync and you have to issue a "yum clean all" command to get everything synchronized again. Is there something like that in Slapt?
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RonB
Registered Linux User #498581
Vector Linux Deluxe 6.0 -- Optiplex GX270
GrannyGeek
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2567


« Reply #12 on: September 04, 2010, 08:56:26 pm »

Shouldn't it show up in GSlapt then?

It should. I'd add the /testing repo to your sources and then click on the Update button. See if it shows up. You can always disable the /testing repo the next time if it makes you uncomfortable to include it.

Quote
I kind of like "trailing edge" and stability more than "bleeding edge," and the newest available package. I guess it it comes from Debian, but when I tested that distribution I always used the stable version. I kind of avoid Ubuntu and its many derivatives specifically because it uses the "testing" branch. Probably the terminology is different in Slackware. But I'm still reluctant to add "testing" to my repository. But mostly I've just gone with the default. And, I'm used to doing regular full updates in CentOS -- but maybe that's not the best way to way to go in Slackware/VectorLinux. I obviously need to learn more.

/testing in VectorLinux is for packages, not the whole distribution. You can decide which packages from /testing you want enough to be a bit daring; you don't  have to install all of them, or any of them. But particularly in the case of browsers, a new version is often issued to fix security holes. I want that kind of update as soon as I can get it. Since all packages go in /testing first, I don't want to wait for days or weeks for the package to make its way out of testing. That's why I keep /testing enabled and just make sure I know where an update is coming from. Mostly I avoid things in /testing unless I know for sure that I want them, not just because they're new.

One way you can find out what upgrades are available in /testing without keeping /testing enabled is to check *just* testing in your Sources, then do Update to get your new list of packages. Clicking on Update in Gslapt simply updates your package list; it doesn't do an update of the packages. After you've updated the package list with what's available in /testing, click on Mark All Upgrades, then on F4 to View Marked. You'll see just the packages in /testing and if you want one, make a note of it. Then enable your usual repo sources (including /testing), update again, and then click on the package or packages in /testing that you noted you want to install. You need to have /testing enabled when you do this because there may be dependencies there that have to be fetched along with your package. When you've finished selecting the updates you want, click on Execute. The dialog will show you what packages will be installed. Finally click on OK and Gslapt will get your updates. Once everything is completed, go to Preferences, Sources and exclude /testing again. You can then continue doing upgrades your preferred way.

Again, in VectorLinux /testing does not refer to the distro itself. It includes just packages that aren't considered ready for the regular repos because they haven't been tried by enough users. If you do install a package from /testing, it would really help if you would go to the "VL package news and Updates" section of the forum and leave a reply in the topic that announces that package. If you have or don't have problems, mention that.

Quote
gsb-2.22 contains gnome things that are needed by some packages. Usually they are needed as dependencies.

Quote
Thanks. Wondered what that was. So it's Gnome 2.22.

I don't know if it's gnome 2.22. I also don't know how much of Gnome is included. Can you install Gnome from the gsb-2.22 repo? I have no idea.

Quote
I know sometimes that yum (in CentOS) gets out of sync and you have to issue a "yum clean all" command to get everything synchronized again. Is there something like that in Slapt?

I don't know. Maybe there's something in the command-line slapt-get. Nothing jumped out at me when I did man slapt-get.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
RonB
Vectorite
***
Posts: 120


« Reply #13 on: September 04, 2010, 10:30:26 pm »

Hi Granny,

Thanks for all the explaining. I enabled "/testing" and did a search for Firefox 3.6.8, it still didn't show up. Than I did what you suggested, marked all updates, then checked them for Firefox. Nothing there either. So I unmarked them and turned off "/testing" just to get back to where I was. Then I followed your link to the web page and couldn't find Firefox 3.6.8 there either, but the file did show up in the repository's text file. So I copied the name of that file and did a Google search and found Firefox 3.6.8 on a UK mirror. I downloaded it from there and installed it without issue. For whatever reason I just don't think it's currently in the regular repository, or part of the repository is not available.

I just rechecked the repository. The file is there, under /patches/net -- I have no idea why it wasn't (and still isn't) showing up in GSlapt.

Oh, by the way, I did find that there is a "slapt-get --clean" command. Tried that first but nothing changed.

Thanks for all your help. Earlier today I installed Fedora 13 on the free space I left on this hard drive. It's okay and I'll probably use it in place of CentOS on my desktop, but much slower than VectorLinux. I want a Red Hat distribution for learning Red Hat, but VectorLinux is my home computer Linux.

BTW, this is the mirror I used...

http://212.219.56.134/sites/ftp.osuosl.org/pub/veclinux-6.0/patches/net/

Again, thanks.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2010, 10:43:17 pm by RonB » Logged

RonB
Registered Linux User #498581
Vector Linux Deluxe 6.0 -- Optiplex GX270
toothandnail
Tester
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2527


« Reply #14 on: September 04, 2010, 10:58:57 pm »

There are a few things you should bear in mind when using slapt-get/gslapt. First, there is no guarantee what may have changed since the last time you looked. So you should always do an update before you do anything else. Second, there is a basic priority system in operation. If you look at /etc/slapt-get/slapt-getrc, you will see at least one repo listing which has :OFFICIAL after the listing. This gives that repo higher priority than any of the others.

The result of that priority is that even though the files in that repo section may not be the most recent, they will always be treated as 'upgrades'. Which is why you may find Gslapt offering you (for example) mc-4.0.7 as an 'upgrade' to mc-4.7.3. Which is a very good reason not to blindly use 'upgrades' as indicated by Gslapt - always check what it is offering against what it will replace.

Another thing that needs to be considered. The repos, especially for Vector 6.0, are now quite extensive. When files are moved from one section (say from testing to patches or extra), there is a great deal of processng invovled, especially if it means that some files have to be 'retired' to 'old'. During that processing, the repos will be in an indeterminate state, and the results of any attempt to pick up files may not be predicatble. There is also variable delay in the time it takes changes to propagete. At the end of any processing run, a command is used to sync the various repo mirrors, but there is no easy way of predicting how long it may take for any individaul mirror to update. Sometimes it can take more than 24 hours to do so.

If you repeatedly can't find something that should be there, report the matter. While repo syncing is out of our control, if there is a long term problem, it can be reported to the maintiners.

Paul.
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