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Author Topic: Please help Netgear router not detecting VectorLinux  (Read 5131 times)
bigpaws
Vectorian
****
Posts: 1843


« Reply #15 on: December 14, 2010, 04:50:44 am »

Ok Now from a fresh install

It is not usually a router problem

Starting fresh. Also including the outputs that you are
helps diagnose the problem.

This ethernet module (driver in windows terms) has two
versions. This module is very close in design for the two
different chipsets.

First let's see if this is a the right ethernet card
Open a terminal as root and type:

dhcpcd eth0

NOTE: There should not be any output. This is calling the router for and ip address.

Now try to ping the router

ping -c3 whateveryourrouteripis

If this fails the next thing would be to try the other module for this ethernet card. Please
follow below.

rmmod 8139too

Now type

 modprobe 8139cp

Now type:

ifconfig eth0 up

Now type:

dhcpcd eth0

Now try to ping your router

ping -c3 whateveryourrouteripis

If the above works then we need to make another change
to keep the above changes. Which we can make later after
the problem is solved.  Please note that if you reboot the
system you will need to issue the commands above to get the
card working.

Bigpaws
 
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Bikklinux
Member
*
Posts: 11


« Reply #16 on: December 14, 2010, 05:37:41 am »

followed as you said Bigpaws this was the result ....still not working

vector://home/Linuxmac
root:# dhcpcd eth0
vector://home/Linuxmac
root:# ping -c3 192.168.1.1
connect: Network is unreachable
vector://home/Linuxmac
root:# ping -c3 192.168.1.2
connect: Network is unreachable
vector://home/Linuxmac
root:# ping -c3 192.168.1.3
connect: Network is unreachable
vector://home/Linuxmac
root:# rmmod 8139too
vector://home/Linuxmac
root:# modprobe 8139cp
vector://home/Linuxmac
root:# ifconfig eth0 up
vector://home/Linuxmac
root:# dhcpcd eth0
vector://home/Linuxmac
root:# ping -c3 192.168.1.1
connect: Network is unreachable
vector://home/Linuxmac
root:# ping -c3 192.168.1.2
connect: Network is unreachable
vector://home/Linuxmac
root:# ping -c3 192.168.1.3
connect: Network is unreachable
vector://home/Linuxmac
root:#
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bigpaws
Vectorian
****
Posts: 1843


« Reply #17 on: December 14, 2010, 05:47:34 am »

Is it possible that you are using a cross over CAT 5?

Did you look at ifconfig to see if an address was assigned?

Is is possible for you to connect to the irc channel irc.freenode #vectorlinux ?

Bigpaws
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Bikklinux
Member
*
Posts: 11


« Reply #18 on: December 14, 2010, 06:04:27 am »

Yes can be there on IRC

its normal ethnet cable not a crossover cable
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newt
Vectorian
****
Posts: 1132



« Reply #19 on: December 14, 2010, 07:14:01 am »

I don't feel like the eth0 device was ever put 'up' using the original module/driver, followed by attempting to get an IP address assigned BEFORE the netconfig borked the previous install. Therefore, I think it's useful to run that test using the following:

rmmod 8139cp
modprobe 8139too
ifconfig eth0 up
dhcpcd eth0


wait 30 seconds... We should really be checking to see if an IP address is being assigned at this point:

ifconfig -a (post the output)

If an IP address is assigned then we should check the routing table, and test ping:

route (post the output)
ping -c3 192.168.1.1

If we find an IP address is assigned but the ping does not work, and the routing table doesn't show the default gateway then we may need to add that:

route add default gw 192.168.1.1
« Last Edit: December 14, 2010, 07:15:52 am by newt » Logged
hata_ph
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 3256


-- Just being myself --


« Reply #20 on: December 14, 2010, 04:30:41 pm »

How about temporary configure static IP on your VL system and try to ping your router...
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Bikklinux
Member
*
Posts: 11


« Reply #21 on: December 14, 2010, 10:36:09 pm »

Quote

rmmod 8139cp


when I type this it gives an error

ERROR: Module 8139cp does not exist in /proc/modules

route gives

Gateway * Genmask 255.0.0.0 Flags U Metric 0 Ref 0 Use Iface 0 lo


route add default gw 192.168.1.1

gives network not reachable



Quote
How about temporary configure static IP on your VL system and try to ping your router

what should I do for this
« Last Edit: December 14, 2010, 10:48:34 pm by Bikklinux » Logged
GrannyGeek
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2567


« Reply #22 on: December 15, 2010, 04:01:10 pm »

Don't hold out much hope for getting a static IP working, but please do let us know if it does.

If your system can't communicate with your router (as your ping results show it does not), you can't set a static IP for your computer. Your router's Internet IP is not static; it is assigned by your ISP. But a static IP for your computer takes the router out of the picture of assigning an IP address because the router is no longer a DHCP server for any computers on your system. Your computer will always have the same address on your network, as determined by YOU.

Have you reset your router? If you haven't, turn off the power to it and let it sit about 30 seconds, then turn the power back on. It will probably take a while but your router should go back to its out-of-the-box settings. If you have a separate modem connected to the router (which in turn is connected to your NIC), turn it off, too. CORRECTION: You need to do more than turn off the router to return it to default settings. There may be a Reset button on the router. Check the router's documentation to find out how to return the router to default settings. Turning off the router for a short time is the first thing to do when things aren't working right, but actually returning to router defaults requires more than that.

It's possible to turn off your router's being able to respond to a ping. But if you can't get into the router, you can't check whether it is allowing pings.

By the way, I have the same NIC you have and it works perfectly and has for over six years with every version of VectorLinux that has come out in all that time. I've never had to do anything to get it working. So there has to be some reason it's not working for you. I have no expertise in that area so I'm afraid I can't help you analyze the problem. The driver I use is 8139too. Is the light on the card shining? I've had times when my CAT5 cable has loosened; invariably the light came back on when I replugged the ethernet cable. If the light is not on, the NIC isn't connected to your router and can't work until the light comes back on.

To set up a fixed IP, use VASM, SUPER, NETWORK, NETCONF, then a name and domain for your computer. I use computerbrand.OURLASTNAME (substituting as you wish). This has nothing at all to do with anything outside your computer. In other words, it doesn't need to be a real domain, just anything you decide to call it. Once you've given your computer a name and domain (the part after the dot), choose STATIC on the next screen. Then you need an address for your computer. This is also arbitrary, but you need to have the first three groups of numbers the same as the first three grouops of numbers for your router. ARE YOU ABSOLUTELY SURE YOUR ROUTER'S ADDRESS IS 192.168.1.1? *After* you reset the router by turning it off and doing whatever is needed to restore the factory defaults, if you can't get at it with http://192.168.1.1 in a browser (if that's the default address), look in your router manual to confirm the default router address (which is also your gateway address). If you are sure you are using the correct address for the router and it's still not working, I strongly suspect a hardware problem. They can fail rapidly. Check with the router provider.

Getting back to VASM, after you assign an address for your computer (the fourth group of numbers can be something between 2 and 255--like maybe 10 or 20), you have to set the netmask. For home or small office networks, that is usually 255.255.255.0 . Then you give the gateway address (the address of your router, 192.168.1.1 if you have it right). Then you give the DNS server address. You should have that from your ISP or you can use something like OpenDNS. That should be it.

Good luck!
--GrannyGeek
« Last Edit: December 17, 2010, 09:06:20 am by GrannyGeek » Logged

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Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
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