VectorLinux
November 26, 2014, 06:47:34 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Visit our home page for VL info. To search the old message board go to http://vectorlinux.com/forum1. The first VL forum is temporarily offline until we can find a host for it. Thanks for your patience.
 
Now powered by KnowledgeDex.
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Please support VectorLinux!
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Cloudy Complications.  (Read 1520 times)
nightflier
Administrator
Vectorian
*****
Posts: 4030



« on: December 15, 2010, 05:58:22 pm »

Count me out of the Cloud Computing concept, at least for the foreseeable future.

A client asked me to trouble shoot a problem with email. Said that mail sent between a Mobileme account and an ISP's mail account was garbled. Sure enough, mobileme uses html formatting, and the receiving webmail client displayed the raw html code. Poking through both accounts, I found no way of setting mobileme to use plaintext, or change the other one to display the mails in an easy to read format.

On my "fat client" desktop machine, my email client can be set to use html or plain text. I always use plain text, because I figure the content of the message is the important part, and it also is much more efficient. Additionally, I have options regarding how I view incoming mail. There are a number of email clients available for me to use. If I'm really ambitious, I can obtain the source code for them and modify it. My options are many.

Not so with cloud computing. What they give you is what you get. And tomorrow it may be different. Or gone.
Logged
M0E-lnx
Administrator
Vectorian
*****
Posts: 3192



« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2010, 07:43:41 am »

So much for the "To the clould" commercials Wink
Logged

GrannyGeek
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2567


« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2010, 09:31:29 pm »

I don't understand the problem. I know nothing about mobileme, but there are other options for e-mail in the cloud: Gmail, Yahoo Mail, Hotmail, AOL Mail come to mind immediately and there are probably others I haven't heard of. So unless there is something requiring mobileme to be used, a simple solution would be to use a different e-mail program.

Same for other cloud solutions. You can store and edit your photos in the cloud if you wish, store your music in the cloud, and use Google Docs and other office apps in the cloud.

I'm mostly not in the cloud now for a few reasons: I don't want to be unable to do anything if my apps and data are in the cloud and I don't have Internet access at the time, and my connection (4 Mbs) isn't fast enough for working comfortably and efficiently. Other people object to trusting their data to an entity not under their control. I'm not sure having your data on your own machine is really safer because computers can be hacked and there are issues with fire, theft, catastrophic hardware breakdown, and natural disasters.

On the other hand, having access to your data from any device that can connect to the Internet has a lot to be said for it.
--GrannyGeek
Logged

Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
M0E-lnx
Administrator
Vectorian
*****
Posts: 3192



« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2010, 06:04:13 am »

Completely agree with the disadvantages that the cloud has against it. I think it's a great concept, but i'm not sure we are there yet. There is still a lot of people out there with dial up connections others with these 3G mobile modems/wap devices. I'm not sure working with these in an environment that depends so heavily on data transfer to a remote location is that confortable. But like I said, it is a really cool concept. The idea splitting your data from your machine is a pretty big thing, so if you have a descent internet connection I think it's ok, you know, aside from the mentioned email problem Wink
Logged

bigpaws
Vectorian
****
Posts: 1857


« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2010, 08:57:01 am »

The mighty "Cloud". States are running to the MS cloud others are running
to Amazon and others for Services.

Minnesota is if not already done so, moving to the cloud. Universities are
doing the same. Cut the pipe, game over. No public services are available.

Where is the problem with this? It wasn't that long ago that people were
in an uproar about Google indexing our files. Which failed for most of the
people I run into, since Google Desktop is running.

In a conspiracy theory. With governments wanting intenrnet kill switches
all of your information can be cut off from you at a moments notice.
A DNS attack (Alot of US services were routed through China last year)
Your information is no longer available.

Now we create a real single point of failure.  Imagine the power of that.

How is the "cloud" being paid for? How are the users generating a
revenue stream to run these networks? Too many questions for
me to feel comfortable with it.

Bigpaws
Logged
nightflier
Administrator
Vectorian
*****
Posts: 4030



« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2010, 04:44:55 pm »

It's not that I don't see the advantage of having access to your data from any location. However, I got tired of the fickleness of on-line services years ago. I was very happy with IBM internet service and my email address "lastname@ibm.net". It went away. HotPOP mail service: cut off without warning. Geocities: .. well, no great loss for me personally. Eventually, I bought my own domain and hosting. Less than $5/mo gives me on-line storage capacity and persistent email addresses that are not at the mercy of any one service provider. I have moved it between hosting companies when better deals came along. I control the content and how it is used.

I did sign up for Facebook to stay in touch with my kids. It started out being pretty good, but it annoyed me when the interface and the terms of usage kept changing.

Mobileme: have you ever tried to get an Apple computer user to leave their walled garden?
Logged
GrannyGeek
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2567


« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2010, 09:09:36 pm »

First I accessed the Internet through CompuServe, but that was way back before e-mail became a big thing. I'd get maybe one message a month, max. But CompuServe was a long distance call back in those dialup days, so when we got an actual ISP in our area, I signed up and didn't get on CompuServe through dialing a node (long distance). After a few years, I changed ISPs to one that had a less expensive local number. So that was my first e-mail address change. Believe it or not, my former ISP gave me free forwarding to my new e-mail address *for a year*. I've been with my present ISP ever since. I also get something like a gig of space on their servers but I've never used it. I think I switched to broadband a year after my ISP offered it

Changing an e-mail address is a hassle and the only solution is having your own domain, but I really don't need that. I also have rarely used accounts at Gmail, Yahoo Mail, AOL Mail, live.com (same as Hotmail) and Facebook. I hate Facebook but joined because some family members post photos and videos there. I don't really participate in Facebook at all. I rarely reply to requests to be someone's friend and the only ones who are my friends are close relatives (my granddaughter, for instance) . I've turned off as much sharing as possible and when I do go on Facebook, it's usually to make sure they haven't done something that would make my stuff public or visible by "friends of friends."

I googled on Mobile Me and discovered it's run by Apple. First I went to the site with Opera and was informed that it wasn't supported. Nevertheless, it let me into the login page. Then I tried with the latest Firefox and again got the "unsupported" message, though Firefox is listed as acceptable. I guess they don't want Linux users. I did get into the login page, just as with Opera.

It seems the purpose is to sync everything with all your Apple mobile devices and your computers. I think that's what Windows Live is supposed to do, too. I do have an account at live.com which I got primarily for the free 25 gigs of space on SkyDrive (though I haven't used much of it). I don't consider any of these to be eternal.

I've read in a few places that Ubuntu is making big inroads in the server market because of its close and integrated support for the cloud. Like it or not, businesses are moving to the cloud. Fortunately, home users like me still have a choice.
--GrannyGeek
Logged

Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
roarde
Vectorian
****
Posts: 541


move the needle


« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2010, 06:51:31 am »

I googled on Mobile Me and discovered it's run by Apple. First I went to the site with Opera and was informed that it wasn't supported. Nevertheless, it let me into the login page. Then I tried with the latest Firefox and again got the "unsupported" message, though Firefox is listed as acceptable. I guess they don't want Linux users. I did get into the login page, just as with Opera.

"Acceptable browser" is just one of the minimum requirements. Another is the latest version of either OSX or Windows 7.
Logged

Robert
VL STD 7.1 RC2.3, icewmvmods
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!