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Author Topic: Chrome 12.x calls VL 6 "obsolete"  (Read 13655 times)
RonB
Vectorite
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Posts: 120


« on: June 09, 2011, 02:47:07 am »

After having to download a couple library files to get Chrome 11.x to work in VectorLinux 6 Standard, I downloaded the newest (v12.x) of Chrome and got a "Your operating system is obsolete" message (paraphrased). It also wanted to set up a keyring, which I had no interest in, as I never save passwords online anyhow -- and I've got the preferences set to "never offer to save passwords." It kind of worked despite the message, but I had issues, so dropped back to Chrome 11. Does anyone know "why" Chrome would judge VL 6 as "obsolete?" (How rude.) I'm also testing Firefox 4 on this same install and it's last "upgrade" (last night) was to version 5 beta -- and it had no issues whatsoever with my "obsolete" OS. I like Chrome but I don't like arbitrary "obsolete" messages. I guess I could probably go to Chromium, but that doesn't sync right -- I know because that's why I use on CentOS -- (and I like the sync feature).

At any rate I thought I would whine a bit. I guess VL 7 should take care of the "obsolete" issue but I still don't like the Chrome's "obsolete" message. I kind of wish Firefox worked a little more like Chrome, so I wouldn't have to worry about it.
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RonB
Registered Linux User #498581
Vector Linux Deluxe 6.0 -- Optiplex GX270
retired1af
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Vectorian
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Posts: 1264



« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2011, 10:52:07 am »

Just took a look through the Google forums, and you aren't the only one who is complaining about the message.

Seems Google, in its infinite arrogance, has taken upon themselves to declare certain OS's "obsolete". As a result, the browser will no longer update.

Pretty much clinches things for me. I'll stick with FireFox and Opera.
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ASUS K73 Intel i3 Dual Core 2.3GHz
GrannyGeek
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Vectorian
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Posts: 2567


« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2011, 02:42:29 pm »

So far I have refused to use Chrome. I'm wary of Google. It has its fingers in *everything* and may turn into a worse Microsoft than Microsoft (which is on a decline).

I've never noticed any slowness with Opera and I'm fine with Firefox and SeaMonkey, too.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
vectornewb
Member
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Posts: 46


« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2011, 09:18:10 pm »

Have a simple rule of thumb the bigger the corp and the more money they have. The higher the craptastic rating and scumbag to sleazball ratio is sure to climb. Google being a megacorp definitely falls well into that.

Feel about the same as the others here. Dislike all the net giants. Think they have too much control, too much self serving motivations and too much craptasticness going on with how they choose to operate. Plus have used FF so long I'm not likely to switch over so webpages will load .00012 secs faster at this point.

Updated to FF 4.01 on VL lite 6.0 last night in a couple clicks. Seems to be running fine. No rude comments about the OS I was using either. Cheesy Ahhh mozilla, the opensource browser that put a boot in IE's a**.
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Andy Price
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Vectorite
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Posts: 237


« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2011, 11:09:34 pm »

So far I have refused to use Chrome. I'm wary of Google. It has its fingers in *everything* and may turn into a worse Microsoft than Microsoft (which is on a decline).
I can certainly understand that sentiment. Google seem to have quietly dropped their "don't be evil" mantra, perhaps a while after they helped a certain country track down and jail a few dissidents. Or traitors, depending on your viewpoint of course. So the question is: who is not evil?
Anyway, I just want to say that Chrome is a fine browser, whoever its parents, and it feels subjectively snappier than the others, even if the numbers don't show it. If nothing else it's given some much-needed competition and is leading the way in interface design, security etc, just like Firefox did way back when...
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vectornewb
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Posts: 46


« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2011, 01:14:05 am »

Did ?

FF is the original and continues to be the original as far as I can tell. The mozilla people are no slouches when it comes to browser development. They have the whole there's a plug-in for it thing going for em. FF is the wordpress of the web browser world. Cheesy

Not to mention, thanks to transparency and about:config. FF is extremely easy to dig into and tweak. Which being a compulsive software tweaker I've done more than my share of. In terms of speed FF 4.01 can hold its own with anything else on the field. As mentioned though am good with waiting an extra .28 secs regardless. If there were something faster. Wouldn't be by all that much regardless. Found chrome and chromium to be less user friendly compared too.

Monopolies always end up biting the little people on the butt. The bigger they get, the bigger the bite. Google already has too much influence online imo. Don't really like seeing them moving into web browsers and linux based OS's now. Though they should've been doing it 10yrs ago or more. They are everybit as craptastic as M$, FB ... etc.

Google has just managed to hide it better. Everybody says ohhhh google gives people all this stuff free !!! Google isn't giving you or anybody else anything for free. They do it to keep the "users" coming back to them. So they can keep printing money monetizing them. Google assigns a dollar value and expectation to anything they let people use and probably to each user too.

People say ohhh that's just business. Well anyone who has a clue about the overall impact and havoc of what people with too much money already always looking for more have inflicted on the world in the name of business. Are more likely to call it scumbaggy, lowlife, psychopathic business. As usual ...

Think the world would be a much better place if M$, Google and Facebook all weren't in it, lol.

Dontcha just luv a good rant ? I feel 10 pounds lighter. Cheesy
« Last Edit: June 21, 2011, 01:20:58 am by vectornewb » Logged
Andy Price
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Vectorite
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Posts: 237


« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2011, 02:05:09 am »

Well if you want a browser to twiddle with then I have to agree, FF is your best choice - a twiddler's delight Smiley
And yes, plugins were an innovation... five years ago. But credit where it's due, we'd still be in the browser dark ages if not for FF. I loved it, even way back when it was called Phoenix and was super light and fast.
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vectornewb
Member
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Posts: 46


« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2011, 03:26:01 am »

Ohhhh U ! Uuuuuu, chrome liker !!! I do in fact like me twiddling .. BUSTED ! Cheesy

Unless there's a super compelling reason guess I'm sticking with good ole FF. Web browser is a preference thing. Not like I wish death on chromium n chrome users. Not even the people still using IE. Will be watching closely, though not bothering to do all that much upgrading. FF is doing this whole new rapid release cycle thing. 4.01 ( or variations, iceape, shiretoko, palemoon ) work well enough under all the OS's installed now. Having to upgrade every time someone turns around could get annoying.

Also wondering how much progress can actually be made every 16 wks ? Oh well ...
« Last Edit: June 21, 2011, 03:27:57 am by vectornewb » Logged
GrannyGeek
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Vectorian
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Posts: 2567


« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2011, 06:50:30 pm »

I feel compelled to point out that Opera had these Firefox "innovations" long before they showed up in Firefox. The things popular Firefox plugins do are already built into Opera, for the most part.

about:config is one thing I hate about Firefox. Why aren't most of those settings available to ordinary mortals in a menu or human readable form, as they are in Opera? It disgusts me that I have to go into about:config to make the backspace key work like in does in most browsers. And there's nothing to help you out, nothing that explains the obscure settings.

I don't dislike Firefox and I do use it sometimes. But Opera is my main browser in all operating systems and has been since Windows 3.1 days.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
vectornewb
Member
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Posts: 46


« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2011, 10:35:18 pm »

Quote
And there's nothing to help you out, nothing that explains the obscure settings

Well nothing except google and any other search engine. Wink Just mainly messing with ya GG. Not like a persons preference of browser is all that big a deal either way it goes. Been thinking about that backspace function thing you mention lately myself. Toying with the idea of setting it up to work as it's supposed to. Agree that is a wee bit annoying ... oh well.

Been using the alt and arrows keys to shortcut back/forwards. Was thinking it was just a linux thing. Being newbish ... then noticed the line of code for determining backspace action while reviewing a FF tweak guide. So mozilla's not focusing all that much on linux I guess. Backspace works as expect by default in winblows. Guess it's understandable ... With 90% of PC's being M$ boxes. Logical enough that they'd focus more energy and effort on that platform.

Scratches head, not sure why they wouldn't set that line of code to do what's accepted as normal for web browsers under linux though ... Weird.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2011, 10:43:46 pm by vectornewb » Logged
vectornewb
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Posts: 46


« Reply #10 on: June 22, 2011, 01:48:45 am »

Update: Well FF 5 just came out and mozillas servers must be getting slammed. Took like 30mins to download 8.5mbs on highspeed ... yikes.

lol ... this seemed like an appropriate place to post this. Only been playing with it a couple mins and under winblows. Haven't worked up the nerve to install under VL lite yet. But have to say so far. Look out chrome ... Is definitely peppier than it was with 4.01. At least liking it so far anyway.

Plus ramped up a few tweaks. Is it ill advised in VL to update FF or other browser the old fashioned way ? I mean direct from the provider ? Wondering if issues could crop up, dependencies or it not being well supported and make it become unstable or buggy ?

Went ahead and updated to FF 4.01 on VL lite 6.0 night before last  from the 3.6.16 or whichever it was. Haven't seen any issues yet. Thought if the OS can support version 3.6 why shouldn't it also have what it takes to handle 4.01. Some input on this would be nice from someone who knows. Updating from the official source good, bad ... indifferent idea ? Thanks ... sorry about the offtopic. Nope FF 5 didn't say anything about my using an obsolete OS either and XP is older than dirt. Cheesy
« Last Edit: June 22, 2011, 03:24:46 am by vectornewb » Logged
GrannyGeek
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Vectorian
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Posts: 2567


« Reply #11 on: June 22, 2011, 02:33:00 pm »

Been using the alt and arrows keys to shortcut back/forwards. Was thinking it was just a linux thing.

Nah. I think most browsers offered those as options regardless of platform. Plus other keyboard shortcuts. In Opera you can use the z (back) and x (forward) keys, too. Not mnemonic, positional. Opera also has mouse gestures built in. Right mouse click and hold and move the mouse left or right to move back and forward. You can get those in Firefox with an extension. You can also use the Alt, Control, and Shift keys with mouse clicks to move back and forward in Firefox--also in SeaMonkey, which is built on the same base as Firefox and works similarly.

Quote
So mozilla's not focusing all that much on linux I guess.

Here's a secret for Linux folks who think "open source" belongs mainly to us. It doesn't. I suspect a large portion of users of open source software that has cross platform versions are using Windows. That goes for Firefox without question, Gimp, Scribus, Open Office, Picasa, others I can't think of offhand. It's no longer true that you have to spend the big bucks on software if you're not using Linux. There are loads of free programs for Windows, both open source and proprietary but free to use. So I suggest scratching that "advantage" when we're promoting reasons to use Linux.

I never noticed how backspace works on Windows Firefox. I don't use Windows much and though I do have Firefox installed on my Win 7 computer, I don't think I've ever used it for browsing. About all I do with it is start it to update it and update Flash.

I agree completely that browsers are a personal choice and not something to argue about. I'm glad we have more choices now than we did a few years ago, at least as far as Windows is concerned. All users benefit because with several popular browsers, Web pages have to be more careful to follow standards so all browsers can view them.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
vectornewb
Member
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Posts: 46


« Reply #12 on: June 23, 2011, 11:32:08 am »

No shortage of choices out there that's for sure.

Seems many nix distro's are taking pains to step up their efforts to have the latest browser versions supported and available in their repos. Several I've seen already have FF 5 out. Makes sense too ... latest web browsers seem like it could be a make or break selling point for nix for a lot of people.

I really don't sweat it. Not mandatory to have the latest browser out installed. As long as the one's I'm using work as expected. Latest isn't always a good thing anyway. Remember when I did start experimenting with other browsers for awhile in the linux OS. Probably tried just about every wb known to humanity and some very few people had heard of. Anyway, sometimes latest, as with any software, doesn't necessarily mean best.

Had chromium 10.summin and chrome same version number installed. Out came version 11 and thought alright, this is bound to be better !!! Nope ... crashed left and right, slow as molassas lol.

All that headache and experimentation finally led me to a couple conclusions. Why would anyone need 15 web browers ? 2. It was just simplier for me to stick with the one I was most familiar with. They all do the same thing. One may do this or that a lil better than the others. But likely something they all do better than it does too or have a feature it's missing, shrugs.

GG went ahead and fixed the backspace action for FF 4 in VL. Just a matter of about:config ... search for one line of code in the search bar, change a value of 2, to 0. Restart browser n done ... Backspace works as expected afterwards.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2011, 11:36:44 am by vectornewb » Logged
GrannyGeek
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Vectorian
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Posts: 2567


« Reply #13 on: June 23, 2011, 08:46:12 pm »

There is a bit of a hazard to using an older browser, though--even one release back. New releases are often to fix security issues, which are constantly being found. It may not be something likely to bite us, but I still don't like to be using something on the Internet that has known vulnerabilities.

I wouldn't usually upgrade the day the new release comes out, but within two or three days. I figure if it's a disaster, early adopters will experience the problems and a fix may be forthcoming.

I don't think one browser is enough because it's not unusual for one browser to have difficulties at some site that another does not. On Linux I like to have Opera, Firefox, and SeaMonkey. I don't usually use Konqueror as a browser, if I bother to install kdebase at all. I'm avoiding Chrome and I've stopped bothering with Dillo, Links, Lynx, and others in that class.

>> went ahead and fixed the backspace action for FF 4 in VL. Just a matter of about:config ... search for one line of code in the search bar, change a value of 2, to 0.  >>

Yep, it's easy when you know what to do. By the way, you don't have to restart the  browser. The backspace action takes place as soon as you make the change.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
nightflier
Administrator
Vectorian
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Posts: 4026



« Reply #14 on: June 24, 2011, 03:54:41 am »

I'm sure I'm considered obsolete by many. Once I get used to a workflow I don't like to change it. I just made the leap from FF3 to 5. I still struggle with the "hold down back button for history" instead of the single click used before. That one difference kept me from going to FF4, but the smarter status indicator in 5 makes it worth it.

The whole backspace issue is a good example how users and their preferences are often ignored. The uproar when they changed it was loud enough that it should have prompted a check box option.

Since I'm already ranting.. I used to have Google as my home page, but since "instant search" became mandatory, "about:home" is looking much better. And I'm using the built in search box more.
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