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Author Topic: Windows 7  (Read 3632 times)
Fragadelic
Guest
« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2010, 02:14:40 pm »

For those where money would be an issue, multimedia and gaming would be out of the question so it still really is about the intended use.

Recycling old pc's is great.  I do it all the time.

Folks are always asking me what kind of PC to buy and I always start by asking them what they want to do with it.  If budget is an issue for their intended use, then they really must wait until they have the budget as it would be utterly pointless spending money on something that doesn't meet your needs.

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Deach
Vectorite
***
Posts: 168


« Reply #16 on: January 12, 2010, 04:03:17 pm »

Yep.  What do you want it to do.  My first question too. (or something along those lines).  I'm surprised lately about the younger set that really isn't into gaming that much. (maybe just my circle of people).  Ya if you're a hard core gamer you're gonna have to wait for that high end box with Microsoft on the front.  I guess now with all those games on face book some kids are just playing those too.  (that doesn't seem to take that much of a box).  Intended purpose is very important I totally agree...
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Colonel Panic
Vectorian
****
Posts: 526


« Reply #17 on: January 13, 2010, 01:51:55 am »

It depends what kind of games and multimedia you want too. Even a 5 year old PC will play videos, DVDs and CDs quite comfortably and also some games (don't expect it to play Warcraft though).
« Last Edit: January 13, 2010, 01:56:02 am by Colonel Panic » Logged
Bjrnarlinux
Member
*
Posts: 38


« Reply #18 on: January 14, 2010, 11:51:53 am »

hmmm. I guess, personally, i wouldn't try to sell anyone Vector unless their hardware is really old or they're interested in learning how Linux works without going to the extremes of Linux from Scratch. For a general desktop user with a decent box( Most Norwegians have quite powerful boxes) i would probably stick Ubuntu on it. It is safe, well supported, does it's job well, looks both distinctive and quite good in later releases and there's very little probability that a someone will mess it up in a big way. The downside to this is bloat compared to some other Linux distros( Vector as an example).

 Vector is by no means a very advanced distro and has some of these advantages in some degree, but is more transparent and for a lot of task, IMO, more techy. This is also why i love it. I've messed it up alot of times, left it, fixed it and came back for more. Vector has learned me a lot about my computer. But for a general user this can be quite intimidating.

The biggest selling point for Linux in Norway, IMO, is it's tendency to function well longer than a typical Windows box. Many people by a new computer when a new release of Windows is out, if not more often. Most people don't know how to clean their install of all the cruft(malware, viruses, spyware, replicated dependencies and so forth) that a Windows box accumulates over time. In Linux this i generally not a problem. My own Vector lappy is in Norway quite old, but in a global perspective it's a very new and powerful computer( it's on its fourth year now). Vector runs faster on it than the original XP did and can perform a good number of processes at the same time. My father, by contrast, owns two laptops and is considering getting a desktop. His oldest has kept its XP install all its life and is now very slow, useless for most tasks other than simple web browsing( and is rapidly getting useless for that too). His newest is a Vista machine more powerful than any of my three machines( all laptops BTW) but performs worse than my oldest these days. All because of Windows faults. I don't expect this to change with 7.

This is a very nice vector of attack as it were. I'm installing a lot of cross platform software on my fathers computers, hoping one day to wipe Windows away and install Ubuntu( or some other distro) on them. It's a slow process though. Another selling point is better security.

Don't know if this is a useful perspective or even relative or coherent most of the time, but it's my two NoKs on the subject.
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Life is Beautiful. Let the future generations cleanse it of all evil, oppression and violence, and enjoy it to the full.

Leon Trotskys last words
rbistolfi
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2283


« Reply #19 on: January 14, 2010, 01:48:55 pm »

hmmm. I guess, personally, i wouldn't try to sell anyone Vector unless their hardware is really old or they're interested in learning how Linux works without going to the extremes of Linux from Scratch. For a general desktop user with a decent box( Most Norwegians have quite powerful boxes) i would probably stick Ubuntu on it. It is safe, well supported, does it's job well, looks both distinctive and quite good in later releases and there's very little probability that a someone will mess it up in a big way. The downside to this is bloat compared to some other Linux distros( Vector as an example).

 Vector is by no means a very advanced distro and has some of these advantages in some degree, but is more transparent and for a lot of task, IMO, more techy. This is also why i love it. I've messed it up alot of times, left it, fixed it and came back for more. Vector has learned me a lot about my computer. But for a general user this can be quite intimidating.

The biggest selling point for Linux in Norway, IMO, is it's tendency to function well longer than a typical Windows box. Many people by a new computer when a new release of Windows is out, if not more often. Most people don't know how to clean their install of all the cruft(malware, viruses, spyware, replicated dependencies and so forth) that a Windows box accumulates over time. In Linux this i generally not a problem. My own Vector lappy is in Norway quite old, but in a global perspective it's a very new and powerful computer( it's on its fourth year now). Vector runs faster on it than the original XP did and can perform a good number of processes at the same time. My father, by contrast, owns two laptops and is considering getting a desktop. His oldest has kept its XP install all its life and is now very slow, useless for most tasks other than simple web browsing( and is rapidly getting useless for that too). His newest is a Vista machine more powerful than any of my three machines( all laptops BTW) but performs worse than my oldest these days. All because of Windows faults. I don't expect this to change with 7.

This is a very nice vector of attack as it were. I'm installing a lot of cross platform software on my fathers computers, hoping one day to wipe Windows away and install Ubuntu( or some other distro) on them. It's a slow process though. Another selling point is better security.

Don't know if this is a useful perspective or even relative or coherent most of the time, but it's my two NoKs on the subject.

I would be very interested in knowing what is intimidating in Vector for you, would be really useful information.
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"There is a concept which corrupts and upsets all others. I refer not to Evil, whose limited realm is that of ethics; I refer to the infinite."
Jorge Luis Borges, Avatars of the Tortoise.

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Jumalauta!!
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