Author Topic: What will you be using on your desktop in the near future instead of Vector?  (Read 344 times)

Colonel Panic

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Hi everyone. I've seen some of the experts here saying that it's unwise to continue using Vector because it hasn't been updated for some time and it's likely to be insecure. As it's looking doubtful that Vector will be continuing as a distro, at least in its current form, I'd like to ask what people who have been using Vector will now be using instead?

I assume that we'll all be sticking with Linux, but will you be using either Slackware (or a distro based on it) or something else instead such as MX, Mint or Manjaro?

Thanks in advance,

CP .

P.S. I'd also be interested in hearing from people who are going to continue to be using Vector.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2020, 05:47:26 am by Colonel Panic »

M0E-lnx

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Sounds like to this 'expert' updates is the same thing as security, as if there were no bugs in new software.  The truth is that thinking of software security in those terms is a mistake.  Software security is a game of cat and mouse, from the simplest program to the most complex enterprise platforms, the same principle applies.  You patch one hole, but there is always the risk of opening a new one, or you have others that you dont know about yet.

That being said + all the recent intel hardware bugs that have been revealed recently (which have been present in hardware for decades), it's tough to qualify anything as truly secure.

With that in mid... I myself have become inclined towards debian... because it runs on pretty much anything... The one (significant) drawback, is that the community sucks, so if you're not self-sufficient in a debian environment, good luck.  But then again, I dont use a 'desktop', but rather just a bare install with a command line to install servers and deploy services, so there is not much interaction with a 'desktop'.

I do hope to be able to build one from scratch at some point if given the opportunity.

bigpaws

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Slackware. All my servers and desktops use it. My clients also use Slackware.

I also like openBSD and freeBSD. 

Bigpaws

nightflier

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On strong enough computers, I have used KDE since Corel Linux. Still do, on some Debian base. One machine runs the bleeding edge Neon release, so I can see what is coming next. Kubuntu is easy to use and maintain. Q4OS is lean and great for less powerful machines.

Security is one concern, but so is keeping up with new technologies. Firefox is my daily driver, but like it or not, some things just work better on a current version of Google Chrome. I find myself using meet.jit.si for video conferencing with my family a lot these days.

That said, I still keep VL Light on an old laptop. Just because.

Colonel Panic

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Thanks to everyone who's replied.

Slackware. All my servers and desktops use it. My clients also use Slackware.

That's interesting. I like Slackware too but I've never yet been tempted to use it as a sole distro. There are some good distros based on Slackware, such as Absolute (which I use now), Slackel and Zenwalk.

The one concern I have with it is that updates are issued very infrequently, unlike Debian which issues frequent updates.

I also like openBSD and freeBSD.

Bigpaws

I've never had much luck with the BSDs on my machine, apart from an earlier version of GhostBSD.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2020, 03:33:36 am by Colonel Panic »

Colonel Panic

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Sounds like to this 'expert' updates is the same thing as security, as if there were no bugs in new software.  The truth is that thinking of software security in those terms is a mistake.  Software security is a game of cat and mouse, from the simplest program to the most complex enterprise platforms, the same principle applies.  You patch one hole, but there is always the risk of opening a new one, or you have others that you dont know about yet.

That being said + all the recent intel hardware bugs that have been revealed recently (which have been present in hardware for decades), it's tough to qualify anything as truly secure.

With that in mid... I myself have become inclined towards debian... because it runs on pretty much anything... The one (significant) drawback, is that the community sucks, so if you're not self-sufficient in a debian environment, good luck.  But then again, I dont use a 'desktop', but rather just a bare install with a command line to install servers and deploy services, so there is not much interaction with a 'desktop'.

I do hope to be able to build one from scratch at some point if given the opportunity.

(and Nightflier too) I agree about Debian though I like distros based on Debian better than Debian itself (I'm posting this from SolydX). Debian is an many ways a fantastic distro but the video drivers for NVidia cards aren't very reliable; I've no experience of the community but you're probably right. Devuan (which doesn't use systemd) is worth a look too.

I tend to be a bit blase about security, thinking that if I don't log in as root I'm pretty safe.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2020, 03:34:12 am by Colonel Panic »

nightflier

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I tend to be a bit blase about security, thinking that if I don't log in as root I'm pretty safe.

My main concern is not that someone/thing gains root access and breaks my desktop system. I'm more worried about what happens in my browser. Today's browsers are more complex and capable than many older operating systems. Surveillance, keyloggers, miners, malware distribution, all will run in user space.

I normally stick to known sites and run script blockers. If I want to go "exploring", I fire up a discardable virtual machine. For the really paranoid, run a live distro in a VM.  ;D

retired1af

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My daily driver has been Mint for quite some time now, using the Cinnamon desktop.
ASUS K73 Intel i3 Dual Core 2.3GHz

Colonel Panic

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My daily driver has been Mint for quite some time now, using the Cinnamon desktop.

Thanks for replying. I've had mixed results with recent versions of Mint but haven't tried the latest one. I've been impressed with MX and some of the respins I've seen of it, one of which (Exton MX) I'm posting from now.

Colonel Panic

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I tend to be a bit blase about security, thinking that if I don't log in as root I'm pretty safe.

My main concern is not that someone/thing gains root access and breaks my desktop system. I'm more worried about what happens in my browser. Today's browsers are more complex and capable than many older operating systems. Surveillance, keyloggers, miners, malware distribution, all will run in user space.

I normally stick to known sites and run script blockers. If I want to go "exploring", I fire up a discardable virtual machine. For the really paranoid, run a live distro in a VM.  ;D

Thanks for replying, I'll certainly look into those options. My default is a simple Javascript on/off button in the address window which turns JS off when it's not needed (it's surprising how many pages don't need JS to run). I've also been advised to use the "private window" facility in Firefox, which doesn't save cookies to the hard drive, whenever I'm in GMail or similar.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2020, 01:45:06 pm by Colonel Panic »