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Author Topic: installing Inkscape [SOLVED]  (Read 9996 times)
Masta
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Vectorian
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« Reply #15 on: June 08, 2007, 01:07:05 pm »

vvucic,
           If you would please, add the word [solved] into your topic tittle. If you would like help on how to do that, a moderator or administrator may be able to assist you.
   
Thanks.
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vvucic
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« Reply #16 on: June 08, 2007, 01:14:05 pm »

Hello,

I will add.but I am testing still because after solution of the probelm some other packages could not work.  SO i am trying  to investigate whether that probelm is related to solution of inkscape installation or with something else.

Thanks,

veki
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GrannyGeek
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« Reply #17 on: June 08, 2007, 06:15:31 pm »

After running /sbin/ldconfig I can run Inkscape normally.
I think that such a thing should be documented.

It probably is documented somewhere. Otherwise how would I have ever heard of it?<g> I always run ldconfig after I install anything, even if libraries don't seem to be involved. It can't do any harm. I don't run ldconfig if I install something through gslapt because gslapt is supposed to take care of everything.

By the way, you don't have to uninstall and reinstall Inkscape as you're installing the missing dependencies. Just keep running Inkscape from the command line and take *careful* note of any complaints. A lot of those dependencies have very similar names. You have to run ldconfig after you install each and every dependency and before you run Inkscape again. Eventually the messages will stop and Inkscape will start.

I've compiled Inkscape .45 and previous versions, too. And believe me, I would never have believed I'd be compiling programs when I first started using Linux. The great thing about being able to compile a program is that we don't have to wait for someone to make a package--sometimes it's a long wait, or the package doesn't quite work on our system.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
vvucic
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« Reply #18 on: June 08, 2007, 11:07:08 pm »

Sure,

Since program exists there may be a couple of words about it.  But, my point is not about that.
After  years of working with Linux I have I always the same problem.  If I want to behave as average SOHO or private user in some cases as this one it is not possible to solve the problem without asking someone to help.
If I work as someone who is very knowledgeable than I miss the point, freedom should be accessible for everyone.  Besides, distro specific things, some distros do not require users to do ldconfig after each installation.

It is good if you do it and that Slack is made in that way , but some other well know distros do not require that.  My point is that editions as SOHO and the likes that are targeted to ordinary people should have clear and documented tow possible approaches:
1. do things automatically and document possible issues and ways how to solve them
2. do things  manually and document that precisely not only in "man foopcakage" but in "man goal user has to accomplish"

I test more than 20 distros and as far as I see all suffer from that and all of them are struggling with that from the point of system integration mainly.
Actually, setting up hardware, packages, file system, interconnectivity between applications.
I those fields there is no in many cases consistent approach and if there is real reason why is that , there i sno documentation explaining that.  I am willing to join those who would like to write that.  Any volunteers?

Thanx,

veki
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lagagnon
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« Reply #19 on: June 09, 2007, 09:58:17 am »

Besides, distro specific things, some distros do not require users to do ldconfig after each installation.

Veki: you have to remember your situation loading InkScape from source is much different than a normal Linux package. You also had to load libraries after the fact. Whenever libraries are loaded after the fact you must run ldconfig on ANY Unix/Linux system unless you reboot the system, during which ldconfig is run anyways.

It is unfortunate we did not have a pre-packaged InkScape package - you would not have had those hassles and you would not have had to run ldconfig. You must remember you were right down to source code base to get what you wanted and in ANY operating system you have to do special things to then get that compiled code running properly. (and remember: you would not even get that opportunity in MS Windows!).

Anyways, I'm glad you finally got Inkscape working.
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"As people become more intelligent they care less for preachers and more for teachers". Robert G. Ingersoll
rbistolfi
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« Reply #20 on: June 09, 2007, 11:18:59 am »

I am glad you solved too! I think you have a good point. For well or not, there is no standard way to install software in linux. The dependencies issue is the bigger challenge for any distro, because the regular user is not used to work with them. The most popular OS have static packages (they include everything needed on each package of software) and is more easy for the user. But the price is a bigger package, and a less flexible system. So both have pro and cons. And many of the linux pros have a price: an extra effort is needed and the learning curve is a little hard. I think is our choice what kind of system we want, and the big linux challenge is make things more user friendly without lose the freedom and flexibility of the system.

cheers, Rodrigo

PS: There is an argentinian project (finally one from home!  Cheesy) called Ututo Linux, implementing a system called check-ldd, aparently the system can solve the 99% of the dependencies problems, supporting even differents versions of almost every library. Looks promising.
https://www.ututo.org/www/index.php?country=ENGLISH
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"There is a concept which corrupts and upsets all others. I refer not to Evil, whose limited realm is that of ethics; I refer to the infinite."
Jorge Luis Borges, Avatars of the Tortoise.

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Jumalauta!!
vvucic
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« Reply #21 on: June 09, 2007, 01:43:38 pm »

Hello,

yes, I know.  I work with linux approx 12 years :p

I am trying as much as possible to behave as an ordinary user since forums and IRC channels should not be places where meet people that know a lot of things anyway..  I am aware of Ututo and I heard about it from Richard Stallman when he was giving lecture here.
I am not against complexities, please do not get me wrong.  I am FOR complexities but t such a complexities give you freedom if you know how to handle them and I am trying to find a way how to creat documentation which will inform users about that without necessity to fiddle 3 years and read 65 books.
I install VL often in schools including many other distros, but I found VL the best and the most flexible especially for the computer with modes tech. specifications.
Consequently, I am trying to sound as an ordinary teacher in my post since I want to encourage as much as possible ordinary people to write and to make forums places for "the rest of us", although I am personally experienced.  Also, it is good for us to get habit to think as ordinary people.
Believe me, after 40 installations on one day you cannot think at all :p

Thanks,

veki
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rbistolfi
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« Reply #22 on: June 09, 2007, 02:03:01 pm »

Well, looks like your experience is giving to you a nice point of view, as I said, I agree with you about the linux issues and the documentation subject. I really see your point, and I think linux needs to become more user friendly, making more easy-to-manage systems or writing more and better documents. Of course, there is no freedom if the options are unreachable (that is why a good interface is needed).
About the forum, I think this is a very comfortable place for a newbie, I can say it because I am a relative new linux user, and I learn a lot here and the guys are really helpful. Is pretty much for "the rest of us".

Quote
Believe me, after 40 installations on one day you cannot think at all :p
Wow! We can say you are busy! give some rest to those eyes, you'll need them in a few years too  Wink

I like your point of view, nice to have you as a forum member, I hope you stay around.
cheers, Rodrigo
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"There is a concept which corrupts and upsets all others. I refer not to Evil, whose limited realm is that of ethics; I refer to the infinite."
Jorge Luis Borges, Avatars of the Tortoise.

--
Jumalauta!!
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