VectorLinux
July 27, 2014, 09:57:53 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Visit our home page for VL info. To search the old message board go to http://vectorlinux.com/forum1. The first VL forum is temporarily offline until we can find a host for it. Thanks for your patience.
 
Now powered by KnowledgeDex.
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Please support VectorLinux!
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: restore from trash  (Read 1524 times)
jimwill
Member
*
Posts: 43


« on: July 30, 2007, 12:08:52 pm »

OK, (don't ask  Shocked ) how do I restore a file from the trash? Just copy it back or is there some command line that I can use?
Logged
exeterdad
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2046



« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2007, 12:32:20 pm »

In Xfce you click on the trash can icon on the desktop.  Then right click on the file, then select "restore".
Logged
jimwill
Member
*
Posts: 43


« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2007, 12:58:01 pm »

Thank you exeterdad.  Grin
  Unfortunately, I have managed to trap myself at the command line terminal with a bad deletion! Been playing with this since yesterday and found the file in a .trash-0, but can't figure out how to restore it. startx as user fails due to no space in the /tmp dir (which is empty!?  Huh ), as root I can run startx, but can't restore the file from there.

Oh well, I was using the SOHO beta2, so I guess I'll install SOHO final, and learn to be more careful with my deletions!  Grin
Logged
jimwill
Member
*
Posts: 43


« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2007, 02:41:37 am »

In Xfce you click on the trash can icon on the desktop.  Then right click on the file, then select "restore".

Ok exeterdad, I decided to try one more time before wiping my drive. So at boot, as root, i did a startxXfce and managed to restore the file from trash! Thanks for the help! However during my stumbling around I managed to mangle other things, so after backing up everything that I think I might need, I plan on wiping and re-installing SOHO. Maybe this time I can get a better setup!  Grin

Perhaps you or someone can give some aid with that? I have a 40gig hard drive. When I set up the first time I found that running lampp and dragonfly cms filled up my root partition and I had to start linking to directories on the home partition. What would you recommend as a partitioning scheme for that setup? Just a swap and home partition or what? Also,, how would I avoid the problem of /tmp filling up?

Thanks for all the help you guys (and ladies!) give!!
Logged
tomh38
Vectorian
****
Posts: 913



« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2007, 05:49:43 am »

Not an answer, but a duplication of one of jimwill's questions:

How do I keep /tmp from filling up?

This is also a repetition:

Right now I have a "/" partition, a "/home" partition, and a swap partition.  For my next install, does anybody suggest a better partitioning scheme.  There are a lot of opinions on this matter zooming around out there through the intertubes, but I trust the VL people a lot more that what I might find on say, a Red Hat, Ubububiliboo, or Debian forum.

Cuz y'all know yer stuff.

Tom
Logged

"I'm doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won't be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones." - Linus Torvalds, April 1991
exeterdad
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2046



« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2007, 07:51:17 am »

I just keep things simple.  I have my swap partition and a root partition.  Works for me.
Logged
lagagnon
Global Moderator
Vectorian
*****
Posts: 1922



WWW
« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2007, 07:51:29 am »

How do I keep /tmp from filling up?
I think that one of the shutdown scripts cleans out /tmp every time you shutdown or reboot, but someone correct me if I'm wrong. Sometimes flakey software might leave the odd bits of stuff in /tmp, but that is pretty rare. It is never something I have worried about and I have just checked my /tmp and there is very little stuff in there...
Quote
Right now I have a "/" partition, a "/home" partition, and a swap partition.
Perfect. That is what the Slackware world sort of recommends. Having a distinct /home partition makes for easier backups and for reloading your distro while keeping all your configs and data. Having more than those three partitions on a personal workstation is unnecessary, but might be something to consider for a server.
Logged

"As people become more intelligent they care less for preachers and more for teachers". Robert G. Ingersoll
GrannyGeek
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2567


« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2007, 02:09:42 pm »

I just keep things simple.  I have my swap partition and a root partition.  Works for me.

That's what I do, too.

I agree on the value of keeping what's in /home, but I do that by copying /home to an external hard drive. If I were to reinstall, it's a simple matter to restore whatever I want from /home on the backup drive.

I can't recommend having at least one external hard drive enough. It's by far the easiest way to back things up.

If your computer is so old that you can't get USB 2 (it can be supplied by a PCI card or CardBus PCMCIA card), you'll just have to suffer.  Sad Such is life with geriatric computers.
--GrannyGeek
Logged

Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!