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Author Topic: Can't start the X server..  (Read 10120 times)
RTrev
Member
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Posts: 19


« on: August 01, 2007, 09:16:53 am »

A friend turned me on to Vector, and I grabbed the latest live CD to try it out.  I can log in, but any attempt to startx or startxfce4 results in a fatal I/O error 104.. could not connect to X server.

I don't think my setup is exceptionally weird.  I've got an nvidia 7300 GT card with 512M on board, dual digital outputs, and normally run Twinview on a couple of identical flat panels.

Other Live CDs have no trouble with this setup.   My normal distro is Ubuntu, and I just get the nvidia driver, issue a couple commands, and Twinview is up and working fine at 1680x1050 (times two).

I could get the install CD instead of the Live one, install to disk, and try to get the 9631 nvidia-glx driver which works fine with this setup.  Think that might cure my problems, or am I looking at something weirder than that?

Thanks,
Bob
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M0E-lnx
Administrator
Vectorian
*****
Posts: 3192



« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2007, 09:26:24 am »

why dont we start by posting your complete /var/log/Xorg.0.log?

Also, what happens when you run vxconf as root??
Does it pick up the card?

and maybe try editing your xorg.conf to use the vesa driver to get things started...

I would suggest just installing the nvidia driver on the live cd to test things

Most likely your problem is the nvidia driver

so if you know which driver makes your card tick, download it and install it, you may be able to get away.

you may need to slapt-get --install your kernel sources to be able to compile/install your nvidia drivers
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RTrev
Member
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Posts: 19


« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2007, 09:33:38 am »

Okay, thanks.. I'll log in with the live CD again and get that info.. experiment with the drivers, etc.  I do have a little problem, though, in that I have no way to capture or copy/paste any info for later posting here.. since I can't do anything much yet on the live CD in terms of browsing, etc.  Hopefully once I get the driver installed I'll be able to either report the problem as solved or at least get enough of X running to allow browsing back to here.  :-)

Noob warning: kind of new to Linux in general, so perhaps over my head with downloading sources and compiling.  Is Vector designed for folks with a bit more experience that I have?

Thanks,
Bob
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nubcnubdo
Vectorian
****
Posts: 675


« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2007, 10:41:15 am »

Restart computer. Select linux-tui option from LILO OS Selection (menu with penguin logo). Log in as root, enter root password. At command prompt, type "vasm" without quotes, press Enter. Re-configure X server (video) through VASM:

1. select XWINDOW, enter OK
2. select XCONF, enter OK
3. probe for video hardware and mouse? enter YES

to exit:
4. select DONE, enter OK
5. select EXIT, enter OK

to reboot:
7. at CLI (command prompt), type "shutdown -r now" without quotes, press Enter

« Last Edit: August 01, 2007, 11:26:27 am by nubcnubdo » Logged
RTrev
Member
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Posts: 19


« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2007, 11:39:08 am »

Restart computer. Select linux-tui option from LILO OS Selection (menu with penguin logo). Log in as root, enter root password. At command prompt, type "vasm" without quotes, press Enter. Re-configure X server (video) through VASM:

1. select XWINDOW, enter OK
2. select XCONF, enter OK
3. probe for video hardware and mouse? enter YES

to exit:
4. select DONE, enter OK
5. select EXIT, enter OK

to reboot:
7. at CLI (command prompt), type "shutdown -r now" without quotes, press Enter



No joy.  It's weird.. it says hang on a second while it tests the X configuration, and then it says it's fine.  But startx always results in the fatal error 104.  I checked the xorg.conf, and it looked fine.. it had identified the correct PCI bus number, identified the monitor, etc. 

I need to read the docs before proceeding.  I used "slapt-get --search nvidia" and it found one legacy driver, which I thought might be better than nothing.  But "slapt-get --install" with the exact info returned from the search says there's no such package found.

I think I'm in a bit over my head here, but will get the full docs and see what I'm missing on the package manager.

Thanks for the suggestions!
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nubcnubdo
Vectorian
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Posts: 675


« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2007, 11:49:04 am »

Of the many distributions I have tried, VL 5.8 SOHO is just about the only one to load nVidia drivers, where I get the green and white nVidia logo when I boot up. If youre using VL 5.8 Standard, you might try SOHO instead. You wont find a faster KDE-based system.
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RTrev
Member
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Posts: 19


« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2007, 11:51:54 am »

Of the many distributions I have tried, VL 5.8 SOHO is just about the only one to load nVidia drivers, where I get the green and white nVidia logo when I boot up. If youre using VL 5.8 Standard, you might try SOHO instead. You wont find a faster KDE-based system.

Okay, I'll give the SOHO a shot.  Gonna be a while though with my download speed.  Smiley  Thanks!
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RTrev
Member
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Posts: 19


« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2007, 03:19:13 pm »

No joy with SOHO either.  So, the X server won't run, and it can't find my network connection.  I think, with my level of knowledge, that I'm pretty much hosed.   Cry

The motherboard is a Machspeed MSNV-939, with the NVidia nForce 4 Northbridge Chipset.  I don't recommend this board, as they claimed it would support 4G of DDR400, but they failed to mention that it would only support it at 333 MHz.  Good price though.   Undecided

Thanks for the help.. but looks like this is going to have to wait a bit.  I'm looking for parts to set up a test box.. just a little thing that I can play with without hosing my main system.  I'll try Vector again once that's built.. and maybe, if folks are willing, I can explore what's going on while still being able to communicate with the world.  I think one almost has to have two machines available when digging beyond one's knowledge level into Linux; one as the test box and one to use for mayday calls.   Wink

Hope to see you again soon, when that test box comes together.

Thanks again,
Bob
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GrannyGeek
Packager
Vectorian
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Posts: 2567


« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2007, 08:39:28 pm »

I think one almost has to have two machines available when digging beyond one's knowledge level into Linux; one as the test box and one to use for mayday calls.   Wink

Not really. You just need a hard drive large enough for two or three Linux partitions. You can then install an "easy" distro on one and do your testing on other partitions.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
RTrev
Member
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Posts: 19


« Reply #9 on: August 02, 2007, 03:30:09 am »

I think one almost has to have two machines available when digging beyond one's knowledge level into Linux; one as the test box and one to use for mayday calls.   Wink

Not really. You just need a hard drive large enough for two or three Linux partitions. You can then install an "easy" distro on one and do your testing on other partitions.
--GrannyGeek

You're talking to a noob here, though, who can easily be put out of commission by something as simple as GRUB getting trashed by a new install.   Roll Eyes
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retired1af
Packager
Vectorian
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Posts: 1267



« Reply #10 on: August 02, 2007, 03:38:05 am »

My very first distro was Suse on an ancient PIII/450. Grub caused me a LOT of headaches, but I stuck with it and was able to get the system running. Found Vector Linux and I haven't looked back since.

My current setup is a dual boot system with XP and SOHO 5.8. It stays in SOHO 99% of the time.
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ASUS K73 Intel i3 Dual Core 2.3GHz
RTrev
Member
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Posts: 19


« Reply #11 on: August 02, 2007, 03:58:46 am »

My very first distro was Suse on an ancient PIII/450. Grub caused me a LOT of headaches, but I stuck with it and was able to get the system running. Found Vector Linux and I haven't looked back since.

My current setup is a dual boot system with XP and SOHO 5.8. It stays in SOHO 99% of the time.

You got any suggestions about how I can make sure my "daily driver" remains bootable while I work on my hot rod?  I don't have a floppy, so writing GRUB to that isn't an option.  I have a hunch that if I could get Vector to see my nic and to get X running, I'd probably never look back either.  But those two are show-stoppers.  I can't even copy/paste logs to show folks here.  Maybe I could get into Vector and mount another drive to use as the scratch pad for doing that, though.

Maybe a question here would help.. I've got a dual-core AMD with 4G of memory, two 74G Raptors, and two 500G Caviars.  Ubuntu, even with the full Gnome setup, boots in about 20 seconds, and OpenOffice, which I rarely use, will come up in about 3 seconds on the first load.  I wonder if Vector would actually give me much more speed with this setup?  I'm sure it would be perfect for an old or low-powered machine, but is it going to make a big difference with this machine?

BTW, saw a funny sig the other day: "Ubuntu, an ancient African word meaning Slackware is too hard to install."  <g>
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nubcnubdo
Vectorian
****
Posts: 675


« Reply #12 on: August 02, 2007, 06:01:48 am »

If you're handy with the guts of a computer, like carefully removing IDE ribbon cables and power connectors, and you don't mind having one side of the computer case off, you could install a second physical hard drive in the box, and change the ribbon and power connector to use another hard drive. Both hard drives should be jumpered to be Master. Just be sure to disconnect the computer's power cord (mains) whenever you swap the hard drives. As a precaution you should wait at least 30 seconds, up to a minute, after removing the computer's power cord (mains) before tampering with internal parts. [Hint: You'll probably need a small flashlight to do this right. Look for an LED power light on the motherboard.] WARNING:You can permanently damage your equipment with this practice.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2007, 06:26:38 am by nubcnubdo » Logged
M0E-lnx
Administrator
Vectorian
*****
Posts: 3192



« Reply #13 on: August 02, 2007, 06:15:12 am »

Did you try the vesa driver?

edit your xorg.conf
then find the line that says
Code:
Driver "nv" or "nvidia"
Change it to say
Code:
Driver "vesa"

You may get crappy-looking video, but you might be able to go from there
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retired1af
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 1267



« Reply #14 on: August 02, 2007, 06:17:50 am »


You got any suggestions about how I can make sure my "daily driver" remains bootable while I work on my hot rod?  I don't have a floppy, so writing GRUB to that isn't an option.  I have a hunch that if I could get Vector to see my nic and to get X running, I'd probably never look back either.  But those two are show-stoppers.  I can't even copy/paste logs to show folks here.  Maybe I could get into Vector and mount another drive to use as the scratch pad for doing that, though.

Maybe a question here would help.. I've got a dual-core AMD with 4G of memory, two 74G Raptors, and two 500G Caviars.  Ubuntu, even with the full Gnome setup, boots in about 20 seconds, and OpenOffice, which I rarely use, will come up in about 3 seconds on the first load.  I wonder if Vector would actually give me much more speed with this setup?  I'm sure it would be perfect for an old or low-powered machine, but is it going to make a big difference with this machine?

BTW, saw a funny sig the other day: "Ubuntu, an ancient African word meaning Slackware is too hard to install."  <g>

My current machine is fairly new (P4/3GHz). I scrapped Grub in favor of LILO and it works well.

As for your X-Server issue, what resolution are you selecting when installing? Perhaps a lower resolution should be picked first, then modify once everything is up and running.
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ASUS K73 Intel i3 Dual Core 2.3GHz
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