VectorLinux
December 19, 2014, 10:56:11 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Visit our home page for VL info. To search the old message board go to http://vectorlinux.com/forum1. The first VL forum is temporarily offline until we can find a host for it. Thanks for your patience.
 
Now powered by KnowledgeDex.
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Please support VectorLinux!
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: wish list - LiveCD rescue suite  (Read 5639 times)
nubcnubdo
Vectorian
****
Posts: 675


« on: May 28, 2007, 09:16:49 am »

Please enter your wishes for applications to be included in a future LiveCD as part of a Rescue-Recovery-Toolkit suite.  For now, let's just gather all the useful utilities, and later decide which to include on Live CD, and which to include on Live DVD.

A good guide is the latest Parted Magic live CD:
http://partedmagic.com/programs.html

Puppy Linux 2.16 also has a nice selection of tools.

SystemRescueCd has a good selection:
http://www.sysresccd.org/System-tools

I'm gonna start it off with the following:

GParted
Partition Image
TestDisk
GTK Hardware Lister*
dd
ddrescue
fdisk
wipe

* I think this is the sys info tool I've been looking for, lagagnon. I see SystemRescueCd has Aida, which is also a system information tool.

« Last Edit: July 27, 2007, 09:31:10 am by nubcnubdo » Logged
Joe1962
Administrator
Vectorian
*****
Posts: 2499



WWW
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2007, 09:22:03 am »

Personally, I don't think we can compete with System Rescue CD on the generic recovery CD. What we could do is cook up some VL-recovery utilities, that will know how to handle VL idiosyncrasies.
Logged

O'Neill (RE the Asgard): "Usually they ask nicely before they ignore us and do what they damn well please."
http://joe1962.bigbox.info
Running: VL 7 Std 64 + self-cooked XFCE-4.10
nubcnubdo
Vectorian
****
Posts: 675


« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2007, 09:28:12 am »

If GTK Hardware Lister does what I think it does, I would like to put it on all my systems, as standard operating procedure. I found GParted to be very useful when experimenting with Puppy, where GParted is included on its liveCD.

I don't think you can assume that most users know about System Rescue CD, nor that an individual user is inclined to take the trouble to download it, burn it, and know how to make use of it.

The suite doesn't have to be complete, just a nice selection of useful tools, say, 10 utilities/tools, as a convenience to users of the liveCD.

EDIT: I just had a long look at my copy of SystemRescueCd 0.3, and I think it's not so easy to use. You get the command line by default. It's text based. I hunted for 10 minutes trying to find GParted, never found it, although I'm sure it's there.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2007, 11:25:24 am by nubcnubdo » Logged
rbistolfi
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2291


« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2007, 10:46:55 am »

Is this a general recovery cd? or is a tool to recover a VL install? I think Joe is suggesting the second one, because the first one is already covered by SR cd. I like the idea and I think should be a VL recovery cd plus all the tools can fit in a cd for general rescue tasks, and may be some docs about howto diagnose a problem.
Memtest should be in that list. Badram is a tool to prevent the system to access a bad memory sector, needs a kernel patch I think. I used both of them in the past, really useful tools.
Logged

"There is a concept which corrupts and upsets all others. I refer not to Evil, whose limited realm is that of ethics; I refer to the infinite."
Jorge Luis Borges, Avatars of the Tortoise.

--
Jumalauta!!
The Headacher
Louder than you
Global Moderator
Vectorian
*****
Posts: 1553


I like the bass to go BOOM!


WWW
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2007, 11:59:33 am »

Quote
I just had a long look at my copy of SystemRescueCd 0.3, and I think it's not so easy to use. You get the command line by default. It's text based. I hunted for 10 minutes trying to find GParted, never found it, although I'm sure it's there.
It's in the gui thing, you can start it with
Code:
startx
Logged

Most music on my soundcloud page was arranged in programs running on VL.
nubcnubdo
Vectorian
****
Posts: 675


« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2007, 04:45:00 pm »

My opinion: We aren't competing with SystemRescueCd, rather, we are trying to make the LiveCD more useful.
Logged
blurymind
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 1082



« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2007, 10:21:09 am »

fix lilo bootloader and/or reinstall it when needed.
Partition managers:
 that is no gui (cfdisk?) and gparted,qtparted or anything good out there..
Mount and unmount partitions and media.

No-gui quick boot mode,where the user can use cfdisk,reinstall lilo or do anything else possible...
Logged

status: playing around with new tablet and learning to 3d :p
google page :  http://blurymind.googlepages.com
DA PAGE :  http://www.blurymind.deviantart.com/
nubcnubdo
Vectorian
****
Posts: 675


« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2007, 09:59:49 am »

I believe it is essential for the Standard LiveCD to have a good system information tool like GTK Hardware Lister (lshw) or Aida (see SystemRescueCd) and a partition editor such as GParted.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2007, 09:06:16 pm by nubcnubdo » Logged
lagagnon
Global Moderator
Vectorian
*****
Posts: 1922



WWW
« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2007, 12:56:26 pm »

VL 5.8 Standard Live final does have GParted on it. As far as system information tools, I have tried a couple of GTK apps myself (could not remember their names) but was not very impressed - they were just regurgitating information from /proc.

I work on older, unknown status computers all the time with VL, and I find the following command line tools (once you learn to read them) offer all the info I ever need about the system and the hardware:

dmesg
less /var/log/messages
fdisk -l
df
free
lspci
lsusb
lsmod
pnpdump
memtest

dmesg is particularly useful for checking whether the kernel sees all the hardware (also gives you a hardware make and model) and will also spit out immediate errors for things like defective hard drives, CDROM drives, USB devices. It also tells you whether the parallel, serial, NIC ports, etc are working and is also useful for diagnosing ACPI/APM issues. Takes some effort to learn to read it but is probably the most useful hardware diagnostic tool for me.

For the true geek the /proc filesystem tells you almost everything about your hardware. It is fun to browse with mc.
Logged

"As people become more intelligent they care less for preachers and more for teachers". Robert G. Ingersoll
Kocil
Member
*
Posts: 96

Eko M. Budi


« Reply #9 on: June 27, 2007, 12:37:46 am »

Put in the VL GUI installer Smiley
Logged
DrCR
Vectorite
***
Posts: 166


« Reply #10 on: June 28, 2007, 08:03:52 pm »

we are trying to make the LiveCD more useful.

Brilliant! I'm totally for it. Cheesy  I sorely missed the basic tools found in SysResCD and UBCD when I check out the VLLiveCD. Would be stoked to see a VLLive having it all!

Other recommendations to add to the list (if not present):
cpuburn (or equivalent)
mprime (prime95 for linux)
memtest86
Darik's Boot and Nuke (dban), http://dban.sourceforge.net/

Is grubconfig currently in VLLive? I miss it in 5.8SOHO, though that's readily solved with the os residing on the hard drive.

Thanks,
DrCR
« Last Edit: June 28, 2007, 08:46:02 pm by DrCR » Logged
nubcnubdo
Vectorian
****
Posts: 675


« Reply #11 on: July 26, 2007, 11:31:08 am »

hardinfo on Fedora:
http://liquidat.wordpress.com/2007/07/26/hardinfo-on-fedora/

HardInfo: System Profiler and Benchmark
http://hardinfo.berlios.de/HomePage

HardwareLiSter
http://ezix.org/project/wiki/HardwareLiSter
« Last Edit: July 26, 2007, 11:55:35 am by nubcnubdo » Logged
nubcnubdo
Vectorian
****
Posts: 675


« Reply #12 on: July 26, 2007, 11:52:23 am »

Quote
dmesg
less /var/log/messages
fdisk -l
df
free
lspci
lsusb
lsmod
pnpdump
memtest

dmesg is particularly useful for checking whether the kernel sees all the hardware (also gives you a hardware make and model) and will also spit out immediate errors for things like defective hard drives, CDROM drives, USB devices. It also tells you whether the parallel, serial, NIC ports, etc are working and is also useful for diagnosing ACPI/APM issues. Takes some effort to learn to read it but is probably the most useful hardware diagnostic tool for me.

The whole point of having a sysinfo tool/application is so one doesnt have to root around with multiple commands to find out what is under the hood. Instead the information is collected and presented in a readable, organized fashion in a single place, in one stroke.

Suppose, for example, that customer is on the phone with tech support, and the techs need to know what's inside the computer, in order to assist with a problem. Customer runs sysinfo tool, relays info to techs.

I urge the curious to try Everest Home Edition, to see what a good sysinfo tool can be. Everest was originally Aida32, which in turn evolved from Aida16, still available on UBCD (Ultimate Boot CD). Although Everest has recently gone commercial, you can get a slightly older freeware version here:
http://www.oldversion.com/program.php?n=everesthome




« Last Edit: July 27, 2007, 09:26:38 am by nubcnubdo » Logged
nubcnubdo
Vectorian
****
Posts: 675


« Reply #13 on: August 10, 2007, 07:49:56 am »

I recently checked out all the system information tools in UBCD (Ultimate Boot CD). There are 5 or 6 sysinfo utilities available on the second page of the first category. (Press F1 to select Disk Utilities, then press right-pointer navigation key to access page 2 of utilities.) One or two of the sysinfo utilities don't work, but I urge the curious to try the ones that do, especially Aida16.  It's kinda odd that when the utility is called, up comes a Linux initialization, but when the utility is closes, it acts like DOS. Go figure.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2007, 07:51:27 am by nubcnubdo » Logged
Tigerwolf
Vectorite
***
Posts: 152



« Reply #14 on: October 01, 2007, 06:56:19 am »

Please enter your wishes for applications to be included in a future LiveCD as part of a Rescue-Recovery-Toolkit suite.

One very essential item is a way to verify packages to spot and optionally replace missing, corrupted/changed files.   Preferably, this would *not* involve a complete package reinstall.

Ideally, this should be part of the package manager, but it's not there (at least yet anyway).

It's the one single thing I've wanted to see since the beginning.
Logged

=^_^=  Tigerwolf

Running: Vector Linux 5.8 Standard   12-16-2006
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!