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Author Topic: Services?  (Read 1683 times)
orasis
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« on: September 21, 2007, 01:42:55 pm »

Is there anywhere on this site a list of 'Services' which I can turn off and on at will?

I have been tinkering with --- service firewall stop/start - same with 'sshd' -- what other services can I turn on and off in this fashion? Smiley
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nightflier
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« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2007, 01:51:46 pm »

vasm has lots of goodies, including control over services.

To get you started, try: vasm > super > service > srvset
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lagagnon
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« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2007, 03:10:27 pm »

One of the reasons VL is a bit faster than some other distros is that by default it loads only minimal services at default - only those necessary to run  a workstation effectively. You can check all process running on your machine with the command "ps aux". The first 25 or so processes are kernel processes, denoted by the command [xxx] . The next few down the list (e.g. /usr/sbin/syslogd), if fact, anything there ending in a "d" - indicates a daemon service that can be turned on and off.

You are advised to keep syslogd, klogd, crond, inetd and ifplugd running. If you don't do printing you can turn off cupsd. If you don't communicate between Windows and Linux machines using Samba you can turn off smbd and nmbd.

You can turn these services on and off easily using Programs, VASM, SERVICE, SRVSET, 4, and turn on and off whatever you want there. Turning stuff off does decrease boot and shutdown times (probably by a second or two) and decreases RAM usage.

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Joe1962
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« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2007, 03:18:53 pm »

Interesting, I have always deactivated inetd, ever since first reading what it is supposed to do (a few years ago). Any reason to use it on a desktop machine?
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The Headacher
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« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2007, 05:10:49 pm »

Quote
I have always deactivated inetd, ever since first reading what it is supposed to do (a few years ago). Any reason to use it on a desktop machine?
I can't make heads or tails out of "man inetd". I can see why you wouldn't use ifplugd on a desktop system though.

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GrannyGeek
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« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2007, 06:01:53 pm »

I always turn off inetd and haven't noticed a loss of anything.
--GrannyGeek
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lagagnon
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« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2007, 09:29:13 pm »

After a bit of reading I do believe Joe1962 and Granny Geek are correct - inetd is not required for a workstation as its primary function is to: "listen on all ports used by internet services such as FTP, POP3, and telnet. When a TCP packet or UDP packet comes in with a particular port number, inetd launches the appropriate server program to handle the connection."

Obviously such is not required by a casual home user workstation, however, inetd can act as a first pass firewall because it will effectively block access to ports as long as those ports are closed implicitly in its /etc/inetd.conf config file. I would say though, that the VL firewall is probably a much more effective service for doing that sort of thing.
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"As people become more intelligent they care less for preachers and more for teachers". Robert G. Ingersoll
orasis
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« Reply #7 on: September 22, 2007, 04:10:51 am »

Thanks this was very informative and although VASM is a very useful tool... I always prefer to get my hands dirty - until I break something, that is the way I learn - breaking things...  Grin

As for INETD however - it was never enabled by default on my system - I am using VL GOLD 5.8.
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