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Author Topic: Ksysguard says 239,600 kb used 10,936 free No swap available  (Read 1574 times)
vega
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Posts: 4


« on: October 07, 2007, 09:46:34 pm »

Ksysguard says 239,600 kb used 10,936 free No swap space available.72 processes running .I have 256 mB of RAM installed . Performance is rather  sluggish. I'm not sure if my swap is activated.Here is the fstb file .I'm not sure if it's right:



# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# The following is an example. Please see fstab(5) for further details.
# Please refer to mount(1) for a complete description of mount options.
#
# Format:
# <file system>   <mount point>   <type>   <options>   <dump>   <pass>
#
# dump(Cool uses the <dump> field to determine which file systems need
# to be dumped. fsck(Cool uses the <pass> column to determine which file
# systems need to be checked--the root file system should have a 1 in
# this field, other file systems a 2, and any file systems that should
# not be checked (such as MS-initrd/mnt or NFS file systems) a 0.

# The Linux partitions
/dev/hda2 / reiserfs  noatime  0  1

# Shared Windows/Linux partition
#/dev/hda1   /mnt/dos  msdos  umask=0   0  0
#/dev/hda1   /mnt/win  vfat   fmask=111,dmask=0,quiet,shortname=mixed,user  0  0
#/dev/hda1   /mnt/win  ntfs   umask=0   0  0

# Floppy disks
# The 'noauto' option indicates that the file system should not be mounted
# with 'mount -a' 'user' indicates that normal users are allowed to mount
# the file system.
/dev/fd0   /mnt/floppy   auto   defaults,noauto,user   0 0
#/dev/fd1  /mnt/floppy   auto   defaults,noauto,user   0 0

# If you have a ls-120 floppy drive, it could be on /dev/hda b c d etc.
#/dev/hdd   /mnt/ls120   auto   defaults,noauto,user   0 0

# CDROM, CDWRITER, DVD
/dev/cdrom   /mnt/cdrom   iso9660      users,noauto,ro
/dev/cdwriter   /mnt/cdwriter   iso9660      users,noauto,ro

# NFS file systems:
#linux01.gwdg.de:/suse/6.3/i386.de  /mnt/nfs  nfs  defaults  0 0

# proc file system:
proc   /proc   proc   defaults   0 0

# Unix98 devpts filesystem:
none  /dev/pts  devpts  gid=5,mode=666  0 0

# Shared memory filesystem:
tmpfs   /dev/shm    tmpfs defaults 0  0

# Basic USB filesystem
sysfs  /sys  sysfs  defaults  0 0

# example of a VFAT USB pendrive
#/dev/sda1  /mnt/pendrive vfat   fmask=111,dmask=0,noauto,user,quiet,shortname=mixed 0 0


# Swap partitions
# The 'sw' option means auto activating with 'swapon -a'.

/dev/hda5   /mnt/hda5  reiserfs  noatime 0 2
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vega
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Posts: 4


« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2007, 09:48:33 pm »

Quote
Ksysguard says 239,600 kb
I should add that This is the memory usge!!! Roll Eyes
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saulgoode
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Posts: 340



« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2007, 01:26:36 am »

Your FSTAB file doesn't currently specify a swap partition. If 'hda5' is to be your swap partition then the following line would be used:

/dev/hda5        swap             swap        defaults         0   0

You also have to make sure that your swap is activated sometime during boot. This is probably already setup (unless you have changed things around) but you can double-check that the 'swapon -a' command appears in '/etc/rc.d/rc.S'.
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The Headacher
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« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2007, 03:09:29 am »

There is no swap partition enabled in your fstab. You can check "fdisk -l" to see if there is one, I believe it's type should be "Linux swap" or "swap". If so, you should be able to add it with VASM (not sure where exactly in VASM, forced to use winDOS now).

If you want to use hda5 as swap partition it will have to be formatted as such, which is probably also possible from VASM. Keep in mind that you won't be able to permanently store info on the swap partition, and formatting it will destroy any data on it.

But even with swap performance will not be mind blowing when all the RAM is in use, swap will always be slower than memory. Try to make wise use of it. For instance, in VASM disable all services you don't use, and if you use KDE, turn off those silly animations, don't use a different wallpaper for each desktop, and I'm sure there's a lot of other stuff that can be changed as well. Basically, if it's useless turn it off Wink. Also, if you use a browser try not to have too many tabs open.

Some people would advise against using KDE with 256 MB RAM, but it is possible if you tune it a little. I run it on a p3 600 with 320 MB, after boot it uses very little memory. Basically you have to decide what you want to use and what not. For instance, I never really used Klipper, so I turned it off, so it won't load at startup. The same is true for all those other programs that are started at boot... if it's loaded it uses memory.
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vega
Member
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Posts: 4


« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2007, 03:57:18 am »

Your FSTAB file doesn't currently specify a swap partition. If 'hda5' is to be your swap partition then the following line would be used:

/dev/hda5        swap             swap        defaults         0   0

You also have to make sure that your swap is activated sometime during boot. This is probably already setup (unless you have changed things around) but you can double-check that the 'swapon -a' command appears in '/etc/rc.d/rc.S'.

hda5 was formatted to reiserfs so I used gparted live cd and formatted to linux swap , edited fsttab to read the line above 'swapon'  does appear in the file you mentioned and now my swap is active! Thank you!!!
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vega
Member
*
Posts: 4


« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2007, 04:04:13 am »

There is no swap partition enabled in your fstab. You can check "fdisk -l" to see if there is one, I believe it's type should be "Linux swap" or "swap". If so, you should be able to add it with VASM (not sure where exactly in VASM, forced to use winDOS now).

If you want to use hda5 as swap partition it will have to be formatted as such, which is probably also possible from VASM. Keep in mind that you won't be able to permanently store info on the swap partition, and formatting it will destroy any data on it.

But even with swap performance will not be mind blowing when all the RAM is in use, swap will always be slower than memory. Try to make wise use of it. For instance, in VASM disable all services you don't use, and if you use KDE, turn off those silly animations, don't use a different wallpaper for each desktop, and I'm sure there's a lot of other stuff that can be changed as well. Basically, if it's useless turn it off Wink. Also, if you use a browser try not to have too many tabs open.

Some people would advise against using KDE with 256 MB RAM, but it is possible if you tune it a little. I run it on a p3 600 with 320 MB, after boot it uses very little memory. Basically you have to decide what you want to use and what not. For instance, I never really used Klipper, so I turned it off, so it won't load at startup. The same is true for all those other programs that are started at boot... if it's loaded it uses memory.

Thanks!!!  I'll try out your suggestions!!! Right now I'm also using a PIII but at 733Mhz. Kubuntu 7.04 was surprisingly faster than 6.06 and many others . Ubuntu 7.04 was slow (weird!) Anyways my swap is on now and Vector seems pretty cool !!!  Smiley Cool
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saulgoode
Vectorite
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Posts: 340



« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2007, 04:55:52 am »

One of the things you can do (any distro, not just Vector) is tune the amount of swapping of applications that the kernel performs. You do this by writing a value between 0 and 100 to the file '/proc/sys/vm/swappiness'.

A low value means that the kernel will keep programs in memory at the cost of the system cache -- this would be useful if your usage entails a lot of switching between large apps such as GIMP, Firefox, OpenOffice, etc.

A higher value tells the kernel to swap out programs when not in use so that you have more memory available for caching -- this will provide better performance in general but when you switch between programs, it will take longer.

Which you choose is dependent upon how you are using your 'puter.
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A complex system that works is invariably found to have evolved from a simple system that works.
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