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Author Topic: Browser Crunch  (Read 13378 times)
rbistolfi
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« Reply #30 on: November 10, 2007, 05:06:13 am »

That I don't like seamonkey may be it is just personal, for one thing it is slower than firefox
I respectfully beg to differ, and so do many tests I've seen or read.


I tried the Puppy 2.16 version of seamonkey yesterday. It is incredible fast. We should take a look to their config... I will make a virtual machine for it so I can look both at the same time. I guess is about just disabling fancy stuff through about:config
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"There is a concept which corrupts and upsets all others. I refer not to Evil, whose limited realm is that of ethics; I refer to the infinite."
Jorge Luis Borges, Avatars of the Tortoise.

--
Jumalauta!!
GrannyGeek
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« Reply #31 on: November 10, 2007, 10:49:27 am »

Easier than selecting a path in the preferences gui?... I don't think so... Grin... Still, you can always symlink it if you want.

Where do you select the path? In Mail and Newsgroups - Mail Start Page? I'm probably thick, but it was never clear to me exactly what they were talking about. When I see "Chrome" anything, I think my brain shuts off.<g>

The next time I start Windows on this computer (and when might that be?<g>), I'll install SeaMonkey and see how the mail thing works. I honestly don't think it's easier than the symlink, though. Face it--neither one is exactly tough. Wink

As for speed, it's a long time since I've been able to detect a difference among browsers. I think once you pass a threshold in computer power and broadband speed, whatever differences there are are so slight as to be unnoticeable. Dillo starts faster than the other GUI browsers, but after that I don't notice any advantage. Oh yes--I just thought of one. IE7 in XP and Vista is noticeably slower than the others to start. Back in the days when I was running Win 3.1 on a 386SX/16 with 5 megs of RAM and a 14.4 dialup connection, Opera was notably faster than Internet Explorer 3. Yes, I go that far back with Opera. Smiley But as my computers got better and connections got speedier, the differences pretty much disappeared. I continue to use Opera because I've always found the features better.

What do you think about differences between SeaMonkey and Firefox? I just don't see enough difference for me to love one but dislike the other. I think SeaMonkey looks better. They're both plagued with About:Config, which I detest.
--GrannyGeek
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Joe1962
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« Reply #32 on: November 10, 2007, 11:14:05 am »

Easier than selecting a path in the preferences gui?... I don't think so... Grin... Still, you can always symlink it if you want.

Where do you select the path? In Mail and Newsgroups - Mail Start Page? I'm probably thick, but it was never clear to me exactly what they were talking about. When I see "Chrome" anything, I think my brain shuts off.<g>
The path is a is a per-account setting, so it's in the mail account properties page. You can get there by right-clicking on the name of the account in the folder tree, or through the menu ("Edit", "Mail and Newsgroups Account Settings"). Once there select the "Server Settings" for the account and near the bottom you'll find a "Local Directory" box and a "Browse" button (note that it's not an editable textbox).

The next time I start Windows on this computer (and when might that be?<g>), I'll install SeaMonkey and see how the mail thing works. I honestly don't think it's easier than the symlink, though. Face it--neither one is exactly tough. Wink
Lets face it Granny, you are a pretty advanced user. People new to Linux usually prefer not to go to the terminal and set up a symlink... Wink

As for speed, it's a long time since I've been able to detect a difference among browsers. I think once you pass a threshold in computer power and broadband speed, whatever differences there are are so slight as to be unnoticeable. Dillo starts faster than the other GUI browsers, but after that I don't notice any advantage. Oh yes--I just thought of one. IE7 in XP and Vista is noticeably slower than the others to start. Back in the days when I was running Win 3.1 on a 386SX/16 with 5 megs of RAM and a 14.4 dialup connection, Opera was notably faster than Internet Explorer 3. Yes, I go that far back with Opera. Smiley But as my computers got better and connections got speedier, the differences pretty much disappeared. I continue to use Opera because I've always found the features better.
I also moved from IE3 to Opera back then, but when Mozilla came out I tried it because it was open sourced. I found the interface more to my liking than Opera's and it was pretty good for a beta, so I stuck with it. I have tried more recent Operas on and off and still think the same way, though there are a couple of Opera features I'd like in SeaMonkey. On another note, I really missed the Calendar till recently, when someone started to maintain a SeaMonkey compatible branch.

What do you think about differences between SeaMonkey and Firefox? I just don't see enough difference for me to love one but dislike the other. I think SeaMonkey looks better. They're both plagued with About:Config, which I detest.
--GrannyGeek
I was used to integrated suites from using Opera (though interestingly, I never used the classic Netscape Navigator), then I switched to Mozilla (back when there was only one and it was still beta). Been with it ever since, though I did try most of the Firefox versions since 0.1 (had a different name back then), but never quite liked the interface. I followed the natural path from Mozilla Suite to SeaMonkey, when they tried to kill it. I still find the interface better for me and the more extensive preferences tend to mean less trips to the dreaded about:config. I don't really care about loads of plugins, I only use 2 or 3. Even so, the list of SeaMonkey compatible plugins is pretty big now.

If you ask my opinion, the browser that really follows the original dream of a light-weight browser-only Mozilla is K-meleon, but unfortunately you can't get that for Linux... Sad
« Last Edit: November 10, 2007, 11:19:56 am by Joe1962 » Logged

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GrannyGeek
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« Reply #33 on: November 10, 2007, 12:41:28 pm »

The path is a is a per-account setting, so it's in the mail account properties page. You can get there by right-clicking on the name of the account in the folder tree, or through the menu ("Edit", "Mail and Newsgroups Account Settings"). Once there select the "Server Settings" for the account and near the bottom you'll find a "Local Directory" box and a "Browse" button (note that it's not an editable textbox).

I guess I have to set up an account to see this. And I have to do it in Windows first so I can see the shared folder I'd browse to. When I have time...

Quote
Lets face it Granny, you are a pretty advanced user. People new to Linux usually prefer not to go to the terminal and set up a symlink... Wink

Who goes to the terminal? Not I! I use Midnight Commander to create symlinks. Have the source and destination directories in the respective panels, highlight the directory or file you're linking to, hit Control x, s and confirm the symlink's path and name in the dialog box, hit Enter, you're done. Harder to describe than do. If Control x, s is too much to remember, select File menu, symlink instead.

Midnight Commander is a treasure. We should make new users pass a Midnight Commander basics test before we let them use VL. Wink

I don't use many plugins in SeaMonkey or Firefox, either. In fact, I haven't personally added any to either program. Opera has the main stuff built in. As for interfaces, I've always been able to customize Opera to my liking, and without going to some abstruse thing like About:Config. I'm writing this in SeaMonkey just for the fun of using something different.

When I use Firefox or SeaMonkey, I'm always missing my Opera features. I think my favorite is the whole-page (text and graphics) zoom in and out. FF and SM zoom just the text and Opera can do it with a single keystroke in 10% increments (0 zooms in, 9 zooms out, 6 zooms to 100%). I miss one-key keyboard navigation (x goes back, y goes forward). I miss having the option to automatically load at startup whatever tabs were open when I last shut Opera down--no need to make a bookmark set. I miss FastForward and FastRewind. I miss Speed Dial. When it came out I thought "ho-hum," but as I used it I found it really beats a bookmark you use frequently. I miss the Widgets, which can be very handy. I have a currency converter, a units converter (like Celsius to Fahrenheit), a link to Reference.com for dictionaries, encyclopedia, thesaurus, a weather widget. There are hundreds to choose from and they are easily managed, added, deleted, and they run only when you want them to. I LOVE fit to width, which eliminates that horrible horizontal scrolling you encounter on some Web pages and forums. I like having the mail program accessible as a tab in the browser. Don't get me started--I could go on and on. Smiley

The one thing Opera for Linux is lacking in is support for mplayer plugins. So if you need to run some Windows media file on the Web, you'll probably need to use Firefox or SeaMonkey instead. Every now and then I go to the Opera user forums to see if they've improved support for Windows media and I try whatever is suggested, but so far, nothing has been very good. No matter--it's no problem to start FF or SM and I often have them already running anyway.
--GrannyGeek
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Joe1962
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« Reply #34 on: November 10, 2007, 12:48:18 pm »

Lets face it Granny, you are a pretty advanced user. People new to Linux usually prefer not to go to the terminal and set up a symlink... Wink
Who goes to the terminal? Not I! I use Midnight Commander to create symlinks. Have the source and destination directories in the respective panels, highlight the directory or file you're linking to, hit Control x, s and confirm the symlink's path and name in the dialog box, hit Enter, you're done. Harder to describe than do. If Control x, s is too much to remember, select File menu, symlink instead.
I love mc, but it's still a terminal app to those coming from Windows. Even if it does work with the mouse... Wink

Midnight Commander is a treasure. We should make new users pass a Midnight Commander basics test before we let them use VL. Wink
I'd agree, but then I've been known to propose a kind of obligatory driver's license for computer users... Grin
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O'Neill (RE the Asgard): "Usually they ask nicely before they ignore us and do what they damn well please."
http://joe1962.bigbox.info
Running: VL 7 Std 64 + self-cooked XFCE-4.10
rbistolfi
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« Reply #35 on: November 10, 2007, 06:14:42 pm »

Quote
If you ask my opinion, the browser that really follows the original dream of a light-weight browser-only Mozilla is K-meleon, but unfortunately you can't get that for Linux... Sad

I carry K-meleon in my thumb drive, so I can use it if I end on a Windows box. Yesterday I installed on a lappy with just 64 mb of ram, owned by a friend. Linux needs a light weight browser like that.
Guys & Grannys, you should try IMAP protocol. Why duplicate every mail if you can keep it in the server?  Wink
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"There is a concept which corrupts and upsets all others. I refer not to Evil, whose limited realm is that of ethics; I refer to the infinite."
Jorge Luis Borges, Avatars of the Tortoise.

--
Jumalauta!!
GrannyGeek
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« Reply #36 on: November 10, 2007, 06:23:38 pm »

Guys & Grannys, you should try IMAP protocol. Why duplicate every mail if you can keep it in the server?  Wink

Well, it depends on whether your ISP offers IMAP for your e-mail. I don't believe mine does.

However, my ISP does offer Webmail access to our e-mail. So I can read all my e-mail through a browser, delete what I don't want to keep (which is most of it), and download just what I want to my computer. I wouldn't want to have all my e-mail on my ISP's server because I'd have to be connected to the Net to have access to it.
--GrannyGeek
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Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
rbistolfi
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« Reply #37 on: November 10, 2007, 06:30:45 pm »

Yes, I though is very common now, but perhaps is not an option always.
I read mail in many computers, pop3 could be a mess for me, but I download mails I know I want to keep, after all, you don't own the server and I feel more secure keeping them in both, my hd and an imap folder I have for "saved mails". My point is imap doesn't require any configuration more than select the protocol, and I though could be funny to put a third option in this topic Cheesy
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"There is a concept which corrupts and upsets all others. I refer not to Evil, whose limited realm is that of ethics; I refer to the infinite."
Jorge Luis Borges, Avatars of the Tortoise.

--
Jumalauta!!
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