VectorLinux
December 19, 2014, 12:18:42 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Visit our home page for VL info. To search the old message board go to http://vectorlinux.com/forum1. The first VL forum is temporarily offline until we can find a host for it. Thanks for your patience.
 
Now powered by KnowledgeDex.
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Please support VectorLinux!
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: CLI config  (Read 2812 times)
Sweet William
Member
*
Posts: 17


« on: February 01, 2008, 05:01:16 am »

Hi, this really annoys me! A cli with 80x25 on a 17" monitor. No way! What file do I hack to get at least 80x50 or 132x50/60 (10Bh/10Ch) permanently?



TIA

--

Sweet William

using VL-5.8-STD-GOLD

Logged
M0E-lnx
Administrator
Vectorian
*****
Posts: 3195



« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2008, 06:25:04 am »

I assume you mean your fonts look ridiculous on your monitor when in CLI mode.
If this is the case, you can run vliloconf and follow the steps to choose your settings.

You can also pass an argument at boot time in the lilo prompt.
Hit the tab key... then enter

linux vga=791

HTH
Logged

exeterdad
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2046



« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2008, 06:31:35 am »

Hi Bill,
I'm assuming your using Terminal as your terminal since your using using VL-5.8-STD-GOLD.  When Terminal is open, click edit > preferences and you will find some options for the look and feel.  But I can't find any way to affect what size it opens as default.  Your config file is also found in /home/YOURNAME/.config/Terminal.  But again I see no option listed.  Doesn't mean they don't exist.

You can press F11 to go into full screen, but you can also just resize the window so that's not much help.

You can however highly customize xterm.  You can set fonts, colors (fore and background) window size and location.  The list goes on and on.  Typing "man xterm" in a terminal window will yield a very lengthy read.

Very quickly I found a short and sweet example on Google. http://linuxhelp.blogspot.com/2005/10/configuring-xterm-in-linux.html
It's a good one as it demonstrates how to launch xterm from the command line, passing different options, to instantly see what xterm will look like.  Then you can create a launcher with your favorite command, or create alias for that command.  Or create a .Xresources file in your home dir with all your prefs in place.  This isn't the easiest way as the syntax is a bit more complicated.  And you need to log out and back in again to see the results (I believe).  There is mention of "xfontsel", though this utility will help you select a font, it is rather confusing.  And in no way resembles a MS style way of selecting fonts.  Also these font aren't TTF so they will be primitive and jagged looking, straining the heck out of your eyes. I'll post a command for a starting point in a bit.
-geometry 70x24 (from example from link)
You need to pay attention to the -geometry 70x24 option thats listed.  This controls window size and location. There are 2 more numbers to add to that to gain complete control.  Example: -geometry 70x24+0+0  This would open a window 70 columns wide, by 24 rows tall, in the top left of your screen. The last 2 numbers are pixel locations. -0-0 would place the window in the bottom right.  With + numbers, the location is the pixel distance from the top left.  As the numbers get bigger, the farther down or farther to the right the window will appear.  - numbers are affected the same, but from the bottom right.  Keep in mind the size of the font you select will have a impact on the size of the window since window size is measured in columns and rows rather then pixels.  So start with a comfortable font size, then adjust your window size.  The example I will give uses a Monospace TTF font.  It's smooth and uniform, comfortable on the eyes, but Monospace so layout is uniform.  This example also closely mimicks the look, font, and colorings of Terminal.  I happen to like the looks of Terminal so that's the recipe I came up with.
Code:
xterm -geometry 70x24+0+0 -fa Mono -fs 12 -fg white -bg black -cr green -sb -rightbar -j
xterm >> The terminal application.
-geometry 70x24+0+0 >> is here for a example, start with a good font size before adding and adjusting.
-fa Mono >> I believe means font alias.  Mono is the font called for.
-fs 12 >> font size and size 12 for starters.
-fg white >> foreground, or font color white. Also cursor color if not set with -cr.
-bg black >> background color black.
-cr green >> cursor color green.
-sb >> scrollbar.  Not there by default. Odd behavior, will explain.
-rightbar >> forces scrollbar to right side. Default is left.
-j >> jump scrolling.  Recommended as xterm will cheat a few lines on fast output. Rather then print out each and every line and possibly getting too far behind, slowing done the running process.  All lines will be visible when scrolling back though.  No love lost as this kicks in when it scrolls fast enough to be a blur and you can't read it anyway.

Scrollbar is strange.  Not the normal looking scrollbar with up/down arrows. You can fiddle with your different mouse buttons to learn the control.  Too hard to explain.  Middle mouse button will drag it up and down though.

reading "man xterm" will give you more options then you'll ever care to know.  But reading and tweaking will give you results you are happy with.

Once you have your recipe down to your liking, a easy way to create a launcher is to change the command on the one on your task bar.  This is done by right clicking the terminal icon on your task bar and selecting properties.  You'll see a text input box labeled "command" with the command "terminal" in it.  Just add your xterm recipe there and it will be available with one click  Smiley  If you decide you don't like it, returning it to the terminal command is easy enough.

BTW try running just "xterm" with no options.  One ugly looking terminal by default!

I'm gonna shut up now.  Google is your friend and so are we, so ask if you need to.
Go play  Cheesy

Lee

Edit:  M0E posted while I was writing my book, and might be on to what your really asking.  He's talking about running VL in complete text mode, and I'm talking about running a terminal emulator in GUI mode.  In any rate, I typed way too much to delete this post now Cheesy
« Last Edit: February 01, 2008, 06:35:33 am by exeterdad » Logged
tomh38
Vectorian
****
Posts: 913



« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2008, 06:53:21 am »

Sweet William, exeterdad,

I also assumed this was about Terminal.  Some time ago I went looking for documentation on changing the default size of Terminal, and found nothing.  Apparently that isn't possible with Xfce Terminal, or at least not yet.  It's still in development, so that could change.

Sweet William, if you are in fact concerned about a terminal emulator (in X) I would follow what exeterdad said, not just because he's a cool guy, but because it's advice.  Cheesy
Logged

"I'm doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won't be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones." - Linus Torvalds, April 1991
M0E-lnx
Administrator
Vectorian
*****
Posts: 3195



« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2008, 07:01:26 am »

isn't the font size on Terminal a per-user setting? ... I mean the Xfce Terminal application.. I've changed that many times.
Logged

exeterdad
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2046



« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2008, 07:09:36 am »

Yes font size can be set with "Terminal" but I see no way (yet) of adjusting the size of the window itself.  But.....  like xterm, the Terminal window will grow or shrink according to size of font selected.  But I'm not sure I'd like a huge font to get a larger window.

Quit kissing up Tom, takes more then that to make it to my Christmas card mailing list. Cheesy
Logged
toothandnail
Tester
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2527


« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2008, 11:01:51 am »

I also assumed this was about Terminal.  Some time ago I went looking for documentation on changing the default size of Terminal, and found nothing.  Apparently that isn't possible with Xfce Terminal, or at least not yet.  It's still in development, so that could change.

While there is no way that I've found to change the terminal size in preferences, it is easy enough to edit the launcher to change a number of defaults, including terminal size.

I have the following in my terminal launcher properties:

Code:
terminal --geometry=90x34 --hide-menubar

That gives me a terminal size that I find more useful and allows me to turn of the menu bar (which I think is a waste of screen real estate.

It seems a bit inconsistent, since I have to change font size using the preferences dialog. Still, it gets me what I want for a normal terminal...

paul.
Logged
exeterdad
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2046



« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2008, 11:13:18 am »

Very cool! Had no idea geometry would work for Terminal as well.
Logged
toothandnail
Tester
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2527


« Reply #8 on: February 01, 2008, 12:40:17 pm »

Very cool! Had no idea geometry would work for Terminal as well.

 Grin For cool, try --hide-borders

There are others as well - terminal --help will get you a list of all the arguments that it accepts.

paul.
Logged
tomh38
Vectorian
****
Posts: 913



« Reply #9 on: February 01, 2008, 02:15:48 pm »

toothandnail:  Cool beans!  Thanks a lot for that info!

exeterdad:  Wait, you mean you're not the person who sent me the scatological Christmas card this year?
Logged

"I'm doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won't be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones." - Linus Torvalds, April 1991
Sweet William
Member
*
Posts: 17


« Reply #10 on: February 02, 2008, 01:47:57 am »

Hey guys,

You really had a party going last night while I was tucked up in bed.

With all that info to go through it was probably the right thing to do.

Thanks heaps guys
--

Sweet William

using VL-5.8-STD-GOLD
Logged
Sweet William
Member
*
Posts: 17


« Reply #11 on: February 02, 2008, 04:21:59 pm »

Hi guys,

I've had time to digest some of the replys and try some of it.

First, I really ment text mode and not gui mode. I'll be more explicit in future.

I found lilo.conf and changed the line "vga = normal" to "vga = ask" and guess what happened.

ZIP

It seems that unless lilo is installed in the mbr (it can play in its own sandbox, the rest of the drive is out of bounds) it ignores that configuration item at least.

Any suggestions?
--
Sweet William

using VL-5.8-STD-GOLD



Logged
lagagnon
Global Moderator
Vectorian
*****
Posts: 1922



WWW
« Reply #12 on: February 02, 2008, 04:33:13 pm »

Editing the config file for lilo does not actually rewrite its boot map. To do that you need  to now run the following command as root in a terminal:

lilo -v
Logged

"As people become more intelligent they care less for preachers and more for teachers". Robert G. Ingersoll
Sweet William
Member
*
Posts: 17


« Reply #13 on: February 02, 2008, 07:20:12 pm »

Editing the config file for lilo does not actually rewrite its boot map. To do that you need  to now run the following command as root in a terminal:

lilo -v

That's what I've been looking for.

Thanks heaps,
--

Sweet William

using VL-5.8-STD-GOLD

Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!