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Author Topic: No High Speed Internet..  (Read 11470 times)
boneygamba
Member
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Posts: 22



« Reply #45 on: September 16, 2008, 03:44:56 am »


In case I would have to go the replacement route,
---is it sure that I can get it working in Linux?
---which driver would I need?
---would Windows still recognize the replacement card?
---is it easy/save to open the laptop case?

Cariboo

Hello again Cariboo  Grin

If you decide to venture into the innards of your machine then why not have a look at this page:   

http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp/1071163441

From that page:
"Hello, Thank you for contacting Dell Hardware E-Support and Services. I have gone through your issue and feel that the following information will help you. Reseat the mini-PCI card.* - L2 chassis To reseat the mini-PCI card, follow the steps below: Locate the smaller of the two removable panels on the bottom of the computer. Use a small Phillips (#1) to remove the screw. Lift off the cover. Push outward on the two retaining clips. Once the clips release, the card will pop up at an angle. Disconnect the wiring harness and carefully pull the card out of its socket. Reseat the card, following the above steps in reverse order."

If you are careful and follow the instructions you should be OK. The full post alludes to there being more information available via an 'online guide'. Wether or not this is still available i do not know.
Other people(more knowledgeable about such things) may be able to offer advice as to electrical safety.

You never know...you may be able to fix your problem without having to purchase a new part(although they seem to be fairly inexpensive).

--paul

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Cariboo
Vectorite
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Posts: 289



« Reply #46 on: September 17, 2008, 11:00:42 am »



Hello again Cariboo  Grin

If you decide to venture into the innards of your machine then why not have a look at this page:   

http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp/1071163441

--paul


Many thanks Paul  Smiley
I had a look at this page and as I understand it, the guy had a problem with WindowsXP and the network card!
In my case, in Windows the high speed connection via this card works just fine.
The issue is, that Linux does not see/detect the card.

Cariboo
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Life is full of setbacks; Success is measured by the way you deal with them!
newt
Vectorian
****
Posts: 1132



« Reply #47 on: September 17, 2008, 11:42:39 am »

If you have broadband, and plenty of bandwidth, it may be worth a shot to download some other live distributions to see if they fare better with that particular peice of hardware.  If you are able to find a distribution that does then perhaps we can fix VL so that it will also, as well as making a permanent fix for future releases.  My recommendation would be to try Damn Small Linux, PCLinuxOS, and Knoppix.  If you don't have decent bandwidth then Damn Small Linux and Puppy are relatively small.  I'm hoping that you'll be able to find a distro that supports this device so that we can learn from them how to make VL support this device.
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Cariboo
Vectorite
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Posts: 289



« Reply #48 on: September 17, 2008, 03:05:27 pm »

If you have broadband, ................... try Damn Small Linux, PCLinuxOS, and Knoppix.  ......... I'm hoping that you'll be able to find a distro that supports this device so that we can learn from them how to make VL support this device.

I don't have broadband, but I have a Knoppix CD. Can I try Knoppix for that without installing it? I learned it's not that easy to install... Huh
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Life is full of setbacks; Success is measured by the way you deal with them!
newt
Vectorian
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Posts: 1132



« Reply #49 on: September 17, 2008, 05:23:55 pm »

Yes, knoppix is live by default.  You should be able to boot from CD and have knoppix load from the cd (into ram).  Once you reach the desktop, you should be able to run similar commands to see if your hardware is detected (lspci, specifically).  There should not be any password for root, and 'sudo su' is likely the way to access root.  It'll be interesting to see if knoppix can detect your hardware.
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Cariboo
Vectorite
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Posts: 289



« Reply #50 on: September 17, 2008, 08:06:08 pm »

Hi,
I'm running the Knoppix 5.1 Live system. I used the same commands as usual to see if the ethernet is detected...
No success...
I found a tool called "DSL/p ppoE configuration tool" and it allows to load device drivers which I have to choose from categories like: kernel/drivers/net/... or kernel/net/... but I have no clue what driver I would need and all my searches were futil yet... Cry
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Life is full of setbacks; Success is measured by the way you deal with them!
newt
Vectorian
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Posts: 1132



« Reply #51 on: September 17, 2008, 09:42:07 pm »

Well I was really hoping knoppix would show your device; it is debian-based so at least you were testing a different linux base.  Plus, IIRC knoppix has been known for pretty good hardware detection.

If you're willing to download ~90mb then you could try puppy v4.  It's also small live distro and is neither slack- nor debian-based, so you would be testing a different method of hardware detection:
http://ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/linux/distributions/puppylinux/puppy-4.00-k2.6.21.7-seamonkey.iso

At this point, to avoid a hardware change, I'm hoping you'll be able to find a distro that recognizes your hardware so we can fix VL to support it.  As an alternative to replacing a mini-pci card, if you have extra usb connections, you could always try using one of those usb-to-ethernet adapters.  I don't know how well they are supported but I imagine there are (at least) some that are supported.
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toothandnail
Tester
Vectorian
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Posts: 2527


« Reply #52 on: September 18, 2008, 12:26:06 am »

Since the machine has two PCMCIA/Cardbus slots, a PCMCI ethernet adaptor might be the simplest approach. Xircom are usually supported under Linux, as are the IBM (Intel-based) cards. Should be cheap and are not a problem to fit.

paul.
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boneygamba
Member
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Posts: 22



« Reply #53 on: September 18, 2008, 05:10:41 am »

The issue is, that Linux does not see/detect the card.
Cariboo

Sorry for not being clear Cariboo. Originally i had intended to mention to you just to ignore the bits about winXP/2000.  Embarrassed

The main idea that i was trying to get across was that maybe the network interface card is not connected properly and that an inspection of the part could eliminate that as being a possibility.

Here are the official instructions from Dell: (complete with electrical safety precautions  Grin )
http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/ins2500/en/sm_en/remove.htm#1050760


« Last Edit: September 18, 2008, 05:42:07 am by boneygamba » Logged
Cariboo
Vectorite
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Posts: 289



« Reply #54 on: September 18, 2008, 07:32:02 am »

........
If you're willing to download ~90mb then you could try puppy v4.  It's also small live distro and is neither slack- nor debian-based, so you would be testing a different method of hardware detection:
http://ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/linux/distributions/puppylinux/puppy-4.00-k2.6.21.7-seamonkey.iso
.........
Thanks for the help, to all...
I'm willing to try everything..... Grin
I'll keep you posted............!

@Paul
I looked HERE and I couldn't find any second cardbus slot  Huh
« Last Edit: September 18, 2008, 07:42:58 am by Cariboo » Logged

Life is full of setbacks; Success is measured by the way you deal with them!
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