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Author Topic: Migrating...  (Read 8716 times)
caitlyn
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Vectorian
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« Reply #15 on: October 08, 2008, 01:19:19 pm »

I understand. However what do you mean by, "you are buying something that is available without cost."? You have to pay for Xandros and iMagic OS don't you?

Yes and no.  Most of Xandros is made up of GPL software.  You can, if you will, recreate Xandros without the brand name for free.  Just as CentOS is effectively Red Hat Enterprise Linux in a plain brown virtual wrapper without the name, somebody could do the same with Xandros.  Xandros, the company, does also release a free, community-based distribution called Freespire.  Both Xandros and Freespire are based on Debian, which is most certainly free of cost.  I'm honestly not familiar with iMagicOS.

What you pay for when you buy am EeePC with Xandros is having the OS very professionally configured for the particular laptop you are buying,.  You are paying for convenience in essence.  When you buy the enterprise Xandros distribution (or Red Hat, or SLES, or TurboLinux Server) you are paying for support and integration services these companies offer by subscription.  You aren't actually buying the code except for a small amount of proprietary software that may be included.  Vector Linux offers paid support as well, BTW.  VL does not bundle the code with a subscription like a corporate, commercial distro does.

I agree with those who suggest you read the GPL.  Version 2 (not the more recent v. 3) applies to the Linux kernel.   
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eMachines EL-1300G desktop, 1.6GHz AMD Athlon 2650e CPU, 4GB RAM, nVidia GeForce 6150 SE video
CentOS 6.5 (will try VL64-7.1 soon)

Toshiba Satellite A135-S4727,  Intel Pentium T2080 / 1.73 GHz, 2GB RAM, Intel GMA 950

HP Mini 110 netbook, 1.6GHz Intel Atom CPU, 2GB RAM, Intel 950 video, VL 7.1
imagicos
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Posts: 11


« Reply #16 on: October 08, 2008, 02:15:23 pm »

I understand. However what do you mean by, "you are buying something that is available without cost."? You have to pay for Xandros and iMagic OS don't you?

Yes and no.  Most of Xandros is made up of GPL software.  You can, if you will, recreate Xandros without the brand name for free.  Just as CentOS is effectively Red Hat Enterprise Linux in a plain brown virtual wrapper without the name, somebody could do the same with Xandros.  Xandros, the company, does also release a free, community-based distribution called Freespire.  Both Xandros and Freespire are based on Debian, which is most certainly free of cost.  I'm honestly not familiar with iMagicOS.

What you pay for when you buy am EeePC with Xandros is having the OS very professionally configured for the particular laptop you are buying,.  You are paying for convenience in essence.  When you buy the enterprise Xandros distribution (or Red Hat, or SLES, or TurboLinux Server) you are paying for support and integration services these companies offer by subscription.  You aren't actually buying the code except for a small amount of proprietary software that may be included.  Vector Linux offers paid support as well, BTW.  VL does not bundle the code with a subscription like a corporate, commercial distro does.

I agree with those who suggest you read the GPL.  Version 2 (not the more recent v. 3) applies to the Linux kernel.   

Xandros did not release freespire, that was linspire They just bought linspire
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caitlyn
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Vectorian
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Posts: 2876


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« Reply #17 on: October 09, 2008, 04:33:12 pm »

Actually Xandros has announced a Freespire release based on Debian.  The previous release put out by Linspire was based on Ubuntu.  So... Xandros does put out a community based distro and it is, in fact, Freespire.
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eMachines EL-1300G desktop, 1.6GHz AMD Athlon 2650e CPU, 4GB RAM, nVidia GeForce 6150 SE video
CentOS 6.5 (will try VL64-7.1 soon)

Toshiba Satellite A135-S4727,  Intel Pentium T2080 / 1.73 GHz, 2GB RAM, Intel GMA 950

HP Mini 110 netbook, 1.6GHz Intel Atom CPU, 2GB RAM, Intel 950 video, VL 7.1
GrannyGeek
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2567


« Reply #18 on: October 09, 2008, 04:36:19 pm »

I've been using VectorLinux for several years and I *always* either buy the deluxe version of whatever release I'm using or I make a donation equivalent to the cost of the deluxe version.

I think it's very important to provide the funds necessary to keep VectorLinux alive and improving, and the money has to come from the users because VL doesn't have a multimillionaire or a profitable company behind it. Developers should be compensated for their time.

Of course, people who really can't afford the small amount the deluxe version costs could donate whatever they can. And there are the other ways of contributing time rather than or in addition to money that have already been mentioned.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
VgnFrnd
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Posts: 91


« Reply #19 on: October 18, 2008, 08:03:00 am »

I am also interested in the two main questions in this thread: 1) Why use Vector instead of other distributions, and 2) What is the value of purchasing deluxe versions of Vector when the free versions work just fine.

Someone smart once said that the unexamined life is not worth living. I don't know why I care about what some dead Greek guy said, other than his statement seems to accurately capture my life experience. Thus my interest in the questions pursued in this thread. Why do I choose to use and support Vector?

I cannot say that I really know for sure why I like Vector, or why I keep buying deluxe versions, but both choices "just feel right."

I can make a few autobiographical observations. I have been using Linux for only about two years. My family's first computer was a DOS machine that loaded programs through a tape recorder. Since then, I ran a variety of MS machines, including Win 3.1, 95, 98, 98SE, 2000, XP, and Vista. Over the decades, I gradually became more and more frustrated with MS's "crippleware" operating systems. I know very little about MS as a company, but as a longtime user of their operating systems, it seemed to me that they deliberately built their systems with truncated functionality in order to corner users into purchasing additional functionality that should have been a part of the OS.

For me, Vista was the straw that broke the camel's back. I will refrain from falling into a rant and instead merely say that after purchasing a laptop with Vista pre-installed, I declared "enough is enough" and started the by now familiar routine of downloading distros, wiping hard drives, and evaluating installations. I also stopped buying new hardware. Except for an occasional part here and there (such as a quieter cpu fan or a raid controller), I doubt I'll ever buy a new computer again.

Vector first rose to the top of the pile for me because it was one of the only distros that worked with my oldest computers, both laptops and desktops. A couple of other slackware-based distributions would also install, but their approach to functionality was too bare-bones for me. On my oldest machines, Vector edged them out by providing a more user-friendly experience.

For my higher-end hardware, I was initially captivated by the glitz, glam, and glory of the top five distros on DistroWatch. I was new to linux, and I appreciated the comprehensiveness of their "plug-and-play" approach to operating systems and their MS-like "look and feel." Their learning curves were gentle enough that I could make linux work for me while I was using linux to do my work.

Sooner rather than later, however, stability increasingly became a problem on my newer machines running the more popular linux distros. I never expected linux to provide a bug-free computing life (and no operating system ever will), but I learned that many of the problems with system stability that I encountered were beyond both my ability and the ability of each distro's forum community to troubleshoot and solve. Too often, my only recourse was to wipe my drive clean again and reinstall, knowing that it was only a matter of time before system stability deteriorated again and I would have to rinse and repeat.

Meanwhile, my oldest hardware just kept purring along, humming contented operating system tunes.

"Hmm," I finally thought. "What's good for the gander might be good for the goose."

Enter Vector SOHO (but still in its free varieties).

For the first few months after installing Vector SOHO on my newer desktops and laptops, I confess that I felt a little deflated, even defeated. I had wanted all the eye-candy bling and slick point-and-click fling (rhymes with "bling") that made the top five distros so titillating; but I had learned from my experience that there is some truth to the cliche, "don't judge a book by its cover," and to the truism that reading newspapers is a better way to remain informed than watching cable news. I had also become seasoned enough in linux that Vector's comparatively minimalist approach to its Control Center tools and the few minor by-hand configurations I need to make from time to time under Vector actually helped to make using my operating systems interesting, informative, and relevant to my computing life.

Most importantly, Vector SOHO proved to be just as stable, consistent, and reliable on my higher-end hardware as it still is on my decades-old machines. Moreover, I don't feel "lost in the crowd" here on the discussion forum.

Eventually, it dawned on me that I wanted to give something back to the Vector community. Initially, I satisfied this impulse by requesting that Vector's packagers add my favorite applications to the repositories, and thus make them available to other Vector users, which in turn might help make Vector ever-so-slightly more valuable to its users.

But after nearly two years as an end-user of Linux and its kindred open source co-conspirators, I have come to learn something that I think is even more important: I am using Vector because I like it, because it works for me in some vaguely unquantifiable way. I am using Vector because it strikes an optimal balance (for me) between stability, speed, and usability over approximately a dozen hardware platforms spanning decades of recent computing history. I am using Vector because I find the rest of the user community to be friendly, informative, accessible, and nice.

I switched to Linux and other open source software because I was fed up with paying again and again for crippleware that was pressed upon me for profit. I now choose to contribute financially to Vector by purchasing Deluxe versions because I want to support the programmers who support me with an operating system I value. I want to give because I have been given.

I did not arrive at my current sentiments quickly or easily, but I like what Linux, Vector, and other open source teams have done for me: They have helped me to learn that I have choices, and that when I choose to support those who support me, all is right in my world.
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