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Author Topic: Always checks non-root filesystem on boot up![solved]  (Read 3322 times)
Asound
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Posts: 19


« on: November 16, 2008, 11:06:54 am »

Hi,
as the title says, my non-root filesystem will be checked on boot-up all the time. Of course the boot-up takes so much longer! Iam using VectorLinux 5.9 Gold.
Hope somebody can help me, because its driving me crazy.

thanks
« Last Edit: November 23, 2008, 01:04:09 pm by Asound » Logged
GrannyGeek
Packager
Vectorian
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Posts: 2567


« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2008, 04:49:53 pm »

Hi,
as the title says, my non-root filesystem will be checked on boot-up all the time. Of course the boot-up takes so much longer! Iam using VectorLinux 5.9 Gold.
Hope somebody can help me, because its driving me crazy.

What is that drive's line in /etc/fstab? If the last two numbers are 0  0 (that is, zero zero), the drive shouldn't be checked at boot. What is the drive's file system (reiserfs? ext2? ext3? vfat? ntfs?)?
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
Asound
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Posts: 19


« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2008, 09:32:24 am »

The numbers are "0 2" , its an ext2 filesystem.
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GrannyGeek
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Posts: 2567


« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2008, 10:19:38 pm »

The numbers are "0 2" , its an ext2 filesystem.

I'm getting out of the small amount of expertise I have, so I hope those who know more will correct anything I suggest that is inaccurate.

As root you could open /etc/fstab in a text editor such as Mousepad, Adie, or Medit and edit that line. First copy the line and paste it right below the original line. Then put a # in front of the first of the two lines so that it won't be read. Then in the line you copied that doesn't have the # in front of it, change the final 2 to 0 (zero), so that the last two numbers are 0 0. That should stop the file system checking when you boot. Save the file. If you want to return to the original /etc/fstab, you can, as root, delete the copied line and remove the # from the original line. Save the file.

It's unfortunate that you used ext2 on that partition. ext2 is not a journaling file system, so if there are errors on the partition, the system has to run fsck when the drive is not mounted in order to correct them. The Windows equivalent is scandisk or chkdsk. ext3 and reiserfs (and a couple of others less commonly used) are journaling file systems. Drive corruption and errors are much less likely to occur with a journaling file system, so it's rarely necessary to run fsck on an ext3 or reiserfs drive.

Let us know if editing /etc/fstab as I suggested gives you the results you want.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
Asound
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Posts: 19


« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2008, 12:47:22 pm »

Well, editing the fstab file, was an big mistake! May caused by editing it with Textmaker on windows.
Now Vector tries to check the root filesystem (also ext2), but shortly after that some errors appears. In the fstab file are now many lines incorrect.
Before editing the file, the 2 numbers of the root filesystem were "0 0", now there stands "0 1" instead. The numbers of the non-root filesystem changed back to "0 2" again.
Of course I have tried the command "e2fsck -v -y" on the root filesystem, but that hasnt changed anything, because the root filesystem seems to be ok and havnt been checked. And when i used the command on the non-root filesystem, linux checked the filesystem and it seems to be ok now.

So booting with linux is currently impossible.

Here is a picture of it: http://img3.imagebanana.com/view/x8n0grxz/DSC00548.JPG
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newt
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Posts: 1132



« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2008, 12:56:51 pm »

If you're not too invested in your current installation, then perhaps you could try re-installing but using something like ReiserFS for your filesystems to see if the result is better.  Of course, if you have lots of data you don't want to lose then this suggestion is out-of-the-question.

I wonder if you boot via cd (enter 'linux root=/dev/hda1' at the boot: prompt), open/edit/save your fstab, and reboot, if your system will get back to a more normal boot.
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uelsk8s
Administrator
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Posts: 2504



« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2008, 04:38:15 pm »

Are your filesystems being unmounted when you shutdown?
how are you shutting down.

I wonder if you boot via cd (enter 'linux root=/dev/hda1' at the boot: prompt), open/edit/save your fstab, and reboot, if your system will get back to a more normal boot.
newtor, booting from cd the way you showed above will get the same boot error as Asound showed in his screenshot, because it will use his fstab.

You can fix the fstab from within the linux system by giving the root password and remounting root rw.
Code:
mount -o remount,rw /
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GrannyGeek
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Vectorian
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Posts: 2567


« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2008, 06:30:49 pm »

Well, editing the fstab file, was an big mistake! May caused by editing it with Textmaker on windows.

Oh dear! I listed Linux text editors. It didn't occur to me that you might edit the file on Windows. Linux and Windows end lines of a .txt file differently. I *think* Linux uses just a line feed; Windows uses a carriage return and line feed. I could have those mixed up, but they are different.

You can try uelsk8s' suggestion if you need to preserve data. newtor's suggestion to reinstall and use reiserfs or ext3 instead of ext2 is worth doing if you can preserve your data on an external drive, CD, or DVD. If the medium does not have a Linux file system, you should tar the files before you copy them to removable media. This will preserve the Linux permissions and ownership, which will be lost if you do a straight copy to FAT32, ntfs, or CD media.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
Asound
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Posts: 19


« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2008, 10:37:28 am »

"mount -o remount,rw /" hasnt change anything.
But I was getting an idea. I could install Vectorlinux on an VMWare machine, and could take the fstab file from the new install. So I could grab the content of the "damaged" fstab file and would paste it in the new file, but this time using mousepad on Linux for it. And then replace the damaged wih the non-damaged file.
Barely I couldnt install it, because there wasnt any harddisk detekted...
So i will try it with an LiveCD, hope it will work then.

EDIT: Unbelievable, I fixed it!!!!!
I have opened the damaged fstab file with textmaker again and saved it as an doc-file onto my old mp3-player. I have booted up an liveCD with VMWare and have taken the fstab file from it. So I only had to take the content of the damaged fstab file and paste it into the non-damaged, but using AbiWord to take the content of the doc-file and mousepad to paste it into the new fstab file. So Iam now having an non-damaged fstab file, that i replaced with the damaged. Also the filesystems arent checked anymore while booting!

Hmmm, what a nice feeling to be online with Linux again!
« Last Edit: November 23, 2008, 01:07:55 pm by Asound » Logged
GrannyGeek
Packager
Vectorian
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Posts: 2567


« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2008, 08:11:11 pm »

Excellent news, Asound! Enjoy.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
Hamzah
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Posts: 20


Wanna be hacker


« Reply #10 on: July 04, 2010, 07:43:13 pm »

Lucky to find this thread. I have the same problem
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