VectorLinux
April 24, 2014, 12:38:07 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Visit our home page for VL info. To search the old message board go to http://vectorlinux.com/forum1. The first VL forum is temporarily offline until we can find a host for it. Thanks for your patience.
 
Now powered by KnowledgeDex.
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Please support VectorLinux!
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Is Vector Linux for me?  (Read 2773 times)
1nitwit
Member
*
Posts: 2


« on: November 16, 2008, 08:10:03 pm »

First post.  Hello all.   Grin

Am wanting to change from Windows to Linux, but as my username suggests, I am not an expert on computers.  Never heard of Vector before filling out this questionnaire.  http://desktoplinuxathome.com/distro.html  Vector was the resulting number one suggested distribution for me.

I am sick and tired of having to reload my OS every few months.  Of losing my "favorites" list on my web browser.  Of having to reload software.  Of having to renew (and pay for) "anti" software programs to keep out the bad stuff.  Of a whole bunch of other irritating things.  Would love to throw my computer in the trash at times if it weren't so useful.

Currently reading Moving to Linux Second Edition.  Mr. Gagne's top home desktop suggestion (if he absolutely had to) was for Mandrake-now Mandriva.  Have heard of that.  Think I would like the KDE format from what little I've read so far.

I will have to retain a dual boot as my grandson has become addicted to Counter-Strike: Source in Half-Life 2.  Am not familiar with partitioning.

Besides email and web surfing, I just purchased Xara Xtreme4 for working with my digital photos.  I paid for a lifetime membership for downloading free music.  (Well...not exactly free, but free after the inital payment.)  BTW, I lost over 5200 songs on my last OS reload.  A bummer.  Now Ares Ultra doesn't want to work so no more music downloads lately, but that is another story.

Paid for satellite TV, but never been able to watch it.  Will Vector allow me to?

Also have a CAD/CAM program I would like to reload.  I think this will require Windows to run.

Am running a Gamer's Edge DualX Velocity Micro with Athlon 64 X2 3800+ processor with dual core, 2GB DDR400 memory, nVidia GeForce 7800GT video card, Creative Labs SoundBlaster Audigy 4 sound card, and 2 hard drives.  A 74GB 10,000 RPM SATA and a 200GB 7200 RPM SATA for backup.  Think this should be more than enough computer as we all know how bloated Windows has become.

Actually I had thought about investing in a second computer from here.  http://linpc.us/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2:pclinuxos-system&catid=3:newsflash&Itemid=60  Although the CPU is faster than my current system, I don't really know how the rest stacks up to what I already have.  Nor do I know anything about their build quality.  Very satisfied with my Velocity Micro.  The Linux version used received a good review here.  http://www.raiden.net/?cat=2&aid=249  However it received a frown (meaning not good for me) from the suggested Linux flavor form I filled out at the first link I gave.  My grandsons and daughter are why I am considering a second computer.  Hard for me to get on this one when they are here.  Smiley

It is all very confusing.  Too many choices.  Not enough knowledge.  Any help greatly appreciated.  Thanks.
Logged
caitlyn
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2839



WWW
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2008, 09:04:26 pm »

My honest opinion is that Vector is NOT the best choice for you.  It is not the easiest of the bunch for someone new to Linux to learn.  There is no 64-bit version to fully harness the power of your system.  Honestly, you'd be better off with Mandriva or Ubuntu or OpenSuSe.  Ubuntu is the most popular distro now and does have a friendly and helpful community.

Please do understand that whatever Linux you choose there will be a learning curve.  Linux does things completely differently from the way Windows does things.  Most non-technical people who I've worked with who switch to Linux are terribly frustrated at first. If they stick with it within six months they wonder how they ever made do with Windows.  It takes time, patience, and perseverence.

If you do choose Vector you will find a friendly and helpful community.  The 6.0 release (a month or two off) will certainly be easier than 5.9.  I can't say for sure when there will be a 64-bit version but I know it's something the developers want to do.  Don't forget Vector.  Just come back to it later, say... next year sometime.
Logged

eMachines EL-1300G desktop, 1.6GHz AMD Athlon 2650e CPU, 4GB RAM, nVidia GeForce 6150 SE video
VLocity Linux 7.0-rc1

HP Mini 110 netbook, 1.6GHz Intel Atom CPU, 2GB RAM, Intel 950 video
VL 7.0 Light
tomh38
Vectorian
****
Posts: 912



« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2008, 06:41:04 am »

1nitwit:

I agree with what caitlyn wrote.  I just want to reiterate a few things she said and add something of my own.

1)  It would probably be best for you to start with a version of Linux that's easier to install and use.  Of the ones she mentioned, all are probably equally good for someone new to Linux.

2)  If/when you decide to try Vector, you will find the community here very friendly and helpful.  I myself will help you in whatever way I'm able.

For my own part I would add:

1)  Many people who use Linux dual-boot with Windows, since for some things (fewer all the time) Windows is the better choice (gaming is one).

2)  Once you do start using Linux, you will find that you don't have a lot of the problems that you do with Windows (viruses, spyware, etc.).  On the other hand (and now I find I'm repeating caitlyn's post again) Linux is more difficult to learn than Windows.

Finally, I would like to add that caitlyn is much more knowledgeable and experienced with Linux than I am.  I don't say this to be self-deprecating, it's a simple fact. 

Hoping all goes well for you,

Tom
Logged

"I'm doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won't be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones." - Linus Torvalds, April 1991
The Headacher
Louder than you
Global Moderator
Vectorian
*****
Posts: 1545


I like the bass to go BOOM!


WWW
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2008, 10:00:30 am »

I tried VL after a very painful first start with Suse. I pretty much learned Linux with Vector Linux, and if you're a curious type VL is a good way to learn Linux.

What exactly do you plan to do with your Linux install? It's true that there's currently no 64 bit VL (except for an old beta), but for me the 32 bit version does most things just fine. Sure, I have a 64 bit processor, but did I get a 64 bit winDOS with my laptop? Nope. If you plan to do a lot of CPU intensive stuff, you might want to search for a 64 bit distro. If you're not, VL might fit you just fine.

Quote
Also have a CAD/CAM program I would like to reload.  I think this will require Windows to run.
Probably. These are mostly tightly interwoven with DirectX and other Windows technologies. Just out of interest, what program are you referring to?

Logged

Most music on my soundcloud page was arranged in programs running on VL.
caitlyn
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2839



WWW
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2008, 10:35:23 am »

What The Headacher said about 32-bit vs. 64-bit is generally true.  Two places, however, where 64-bit software makes a huge difference are graphics and gaming.  Since you mentioned both you likely will see a big difference in performance between a 64-bit OS running native 64-bit software and a 32-bit OS.  When it comes to running a word processor or surfing the web then 64-bit software really doesn't buy you anything.  It all depends on how you use your system.
Logged

eMachines EL-1300G desktop, 1.6GHz AMD Athlon 2650e CPU, 4GB RAM, nVidia GeForce 6150 SE video
VLocity Linux 7.0-rc1

HP Mini 110 netbook, 1.6GHz Intel Atom CPU, 2GB RAM, Intel 950 video
VL 7.0 Light
1nitwit
Member
*
Posts: 2


« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2008, 07:53:39 pm »

I thank you all for the replies.  Mandriva it is.  I will kept Vector in mind now that I know about it.  My computer is 32-bit.  The CAD/Cam is something I will be seldom using.  I suppose digital editing will be the most intensive use my computer will see for some time to come.  Other than my oldest grandson's gaming which will stay on the Windows section.

No problem if I stop by once in a while for a little light reading, is there?  Grin

In the meantime I am going to play with the Knoppix Live CD that is in the book I am currently reading.  Wish me luck!  Smiley
Logged
bigpaws
Vectorian
****
Posts: 1834


« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2008, 08:35:10 pm »

Quote
No problem if I stop by once in a while for a little light reading, is there? 

Everyone is welcome here! Smiley

Good luck in your quest.

Bigpaws
Logged
caitlyn
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2839



WWW
« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2008, 08:46:33 pm »

My computer is 32-bit

No I don't think so.  You wrote that you has a Athlon 64 X2 3800+ processor.  That's 64-bit.

You are always welcome here.  If you do decide to give Vector Linux a try lots of folks will be glad to help you.

Logged

eMachines EL-1300G desktop, 1.6GHz AMD Athlon 2650e CPU, 4GB RAM, nVidia GeForce 6150 SE video
VLocity Linux 7.0-rc1

HP Mini 110 netbook, 1.6GHz Intel Atom CPU, 2GB RAM, Intel 950 video
VL 7.0 Light
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!