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Author Topic: VL reviews, mentions, etc...  (Read 153738 times)
GrannyGeek
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Vectorian
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Posts: 2567


« Reply #165 on: November 01, 2007, 02:55:02 pm »

If you look at XP, you have SP1, SP2, plus over 100 mb of other patches. Looks like a good case for more frequent updates, or at least, refresh copies of the basic media.

It's true that there are many, many updates to apply if you're installing XP now. If it's been installed for a while, though, the updates are no big deal because we've been applying them all along. Microsoft did issue a Security Update CD for Win 98SE and XP. It was an easy way to get up to date by simply running the CD. Service Pack 2 was also available on CD and also as a 100+ meg file that could be used by businesses for updating multiple machines. I've been intending to create a slipstream CD for XP that includes Service Pack 2 but I haven't gotten around to it.

This just points out that broadband is pretty much a necessity today. I can't imagine having to do updates for Windows--or downloading Linux software such as OOo--on dialup. Unfortunately, there are still many people with no options for having broadband.

Quote
What I would like to see is more chance of upgrading a distribution on a continuing basis.

That would be great but is fraught with difficulty and danger. It's sort of like a Holy Grail.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
toothandnail
Tester
Vectorian
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Posts: 2527


« Reply #166 on: November 02, 2007, 02:36:52 am »

If you look at XP, you have SP1, SP2, plus over 100 mb of other patches. Looks like a good case for more frequent updates, or at least, refresh copies of the basic media.

It's true that there are many, many updates to apply if you're installing XP now. If it's been installed for a while, though, the updates are no big deal because we've been applying them all along. Microsoft did issue a Security Update CD for Win 98SE and XP. It was an easy way to get up to date by simply running the CD. Service Pack 2 was also available on CD and also as a 100+ meg file that could be used by businesses for updating multiple machines. I've been intending to create a slipstream CD for XP that includes Service Pack 2 but I haven't gotten around to it.

I think that the number of patches etc that exist have serious implications for the lifetime of any version of an OS. For instance, after IBM stopped real development on OS/2 (with the release of version 4, in 1996), it became a real problem for anyone installing it fresh. I used to sell systems with OS/2 preinstalled, and by 1999, it had become a major job to do so - first modify the boot floppie ( Smiley remember boot floppies?), then do the basic install. Then install the latest fixpack (OS/2 is much better than Windows in this regard - the fix packs were cumulative, so you only had to install the latest, not all of them in order), then apply a variety of other patches and driver updates. Not only did it require pretty thorough knowledge of both the hardware and software, towards the end, it had started to cut into my (not terribly good) profit margin. The same applies any any situation where you are selling hardware and bundling software, be it OS/2, Windows or Linux. The release cycle of the OS can seriously impact its ability to penetrate the 'market' (if that's the right word in the Linux context).

Slipstream CDs are a nice option (there is now a similar option for OS/2, which saves me a great deal of time if I do an OS/2 install). However, for Windows, they're often not practical. Given the standard MS treatment of customers (and I just love dealing with a firm that starts out with the view that I must be intending to steal from them), there are many places were a standard slipstreamed disk will not work. Thinkpads (or indeed, any IBM machine) are a good case in point - they use a modified OEM copy of XP Pro. So if an install is made using a standard (slipstream or otherwise) XP CD, they will come up as non valid licenses, even using the license supplied with the machine. When you combine that with the number of machines that are delivered with 'recovery' CDs (or no CDs at all), using slipstream versions is often not possible.

Quote
This just points out that broadband is pretty much a necessity today. I can't imagine having to do updates for Windows--or downloading Linux software such as OOo--on dialup. Unfortunately, there are still many people with no options for having broadband.

 Grin I recently had a customer in just that situation. They have a machine with XP installed, but do not have broadband, and use the net only for a bit of email and the occasional bit of surfing. As a result, they had no security updates of any sort, and even their anti-virus software was years out of date. Updating that sort of thing without broadband is either completely impractical or simply enormously expensive.

Personally, even though I've only had broadband for two or three years, I have no idea how I could exist without it...

Quote
Quote
What I would like to see is more chance of upgrading a distribution on a continuing basis.

That would be great but is fraught with difficulty and danger. It's sort of like a Holy Grail.

Zenwalk hasn't been too bad in that respect. The only change that really caused problems was the upgrade from Xorg 6.9 to 7.x - too many things had to be changed to make that practical to upgrade. Even the change when Slackware upgraded its toolchain was ok, though not a job for a novice. I have two desktop machines, one of which is still OS/2, the other has been Zenwalk for the last couple of years. It is a 4.4 install upgraded to 4.8 (not going any further at the moment - JP is doing very strange thins with snapshot at present and I'm not risking a production machine until he fixes it, or I switch the machine to Vector...

paul.

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exeterdad
Packager
Vectorian
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Posts: 2046



« Reply #167 on: November 02, 2007, 11:23:39 am »

It's funny that the slipstream CD has come up.  I was trying to set up my wife's XP computer with faxing last night.  So while trying to install the fax services, it was calling for my Win xp sp2 cd.  Well it was a slipstream created from a stock XP without any service packs.  But the catch is that I took out all the bloat when I made it.  Faxing services not included.  Angry  Windows update site wouldn't work for me last night, so I had to download that huge update file and install it.

Sorry wrong topic... I'll shut up  Smiley
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GrannyGeek
Packager
Vectorian
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Posts: 2567


« Reply #168 on: November 02, 2007, 05:49:04 pm »

OS/2 is much better than Windows in this regard - the fix packs were cumulative, so you only had to install the latest, not all of them in order

Windows service packs are cumulative. That is, you don't have to install SP1 before you install SP2. SP2 includes what was in SP1. But from that point on, you're stuck in Windows Updateland.

Quote
Slipstream CDs are a nice option (there is now a similar option for OS/2, which saves me a great deal of time if I do an OS/2 install). However, for Windows, they're often not practical.

That's true. You have to have a real Windows Installation CD, and most computers sold by the big manufacturers come with Restore CDs, not with real Windows CDs. I do have a retail XP CD because I bought an upgrade copy back in October, 2001. I'm not generally an early upgrader, but right after XP came out one of the bigbox stores was offering over $500 of free-after-rebate stuff, most of which I actually wanted and could use. So I actually made money on the deal. Smiley

I've never had any trouble with XP and have never regretted upgrading to XP in the first week after it came out. I wasn't using Linux heavily until 2004 or so.

If you buy a big-maker computer after a Service Pack comes out, the Restore CDs should have the Service Pack integrated. That still leaves you with the updates since the Service Pack and without broadband, that can be a lengthy download.

Quote
I just love dealing with a firm that starts out with the view that I must be intending to steal from them

The fact is a lot of customers DO steal from Microsoft and are using pirated copies. I am not that unsympathetic to the efforts of Microsoft and other companies to prevent the use of pirated software. I do adhere to licenses. One nice thing about Linux is that you don't have to go through all the authentication and can install the software on as many computers as you want. You have a great operating system without breaking laws or EULAs.

Quote
Personally, even though I've only had broadband for two or three years, I have no idea how I could exist without it...

I've had broadband for five or six years. I will *never* be without it. I wouldn't even consider moving someplace where broadband was unavailable no matter how desirable the place would be from other standpoints. I listen to streaming radio all day, check Google for information five or six times a day, check TV listings, check news and weather and sports scores, and participate in various forums, where I have cyber friends. And that's not even mentioning things like updates and all the Linux software I frequently download.

I am extremely lucky to have had broadband for so many years because I live in a rural area where we don't even have cable TV. You need a satellite dish if you want cable. Our independent local telephone company has worked very hard to have broadband available for 100% of their customers, all of whom are rural. Other companies could do it, but they won't. They really don't care about their rural customers.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
Will
Vectorite
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Posts: 175


« Reply #169 on: November 22, 2007, 09:43:19 am »

Well its good to hear of a company that actually cares about giving their customers more instead ofsitting by and waiting till they've got angry mobs on their hands.
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Dweeberkitty
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Vectorian
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Posts: 836



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« Reply #170 on: December 24, 2007, 03:21:53 pm »

Vector Linux v5.9 GREEN Release:
http://www.linuxpr.com/releases/10289.html
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Registered Linux User #443399
Desktop: Intel Pentium D 3.33Ghz, 320GB hard drive, 2 gigs DDR2 533mhz RAM, NVIDIA Geforce 7800 GS, X2GEN 22" widescreen monitor;
Laptop: Dell Mini 9, Intel Atom 1.6Ghz, 1GB ram
Multimedia Bonus Disc website: http://www.vectorlinuxsolutions.com/
easuter
Global Moderator
Vectorian
*****
Posts: 2160



« Reply #171 on: January 02, 2008, 02:07:17 am »

Here is a glowing review of 5.9 from LinuxSeekers  Smiley:

http://www.linuxseekers.com/content/view/224/1/
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M0E-lnx
Administrator
Vectorian
*****
Posts: 3195



« Reply #172 on: January 02, 2008, 07:04:55 am »

Here is a glowing review of 5.9 from LinuxSeekers  Smiley:

http://www.linuxseekers.com/content/view/224/1/

Nice review!...
Quote from: reviewer link=http://www.linuxseekers.com/content/view/224/1/
I hope that the developers will extend further the capabilities of VASMCC, not just happy with its better look. Maybe all of the custom tools made by the VectorLinux be should included in the VASMCC.
I agree, but that would take tons of work
« Last Edit: January 02, 2008, 07:11:58 am by M0E-lnx » Logged

Joe1962
Administrator
Vectorian
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Posts: 2499



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« Reply #173 on: January 03, 2008, 06:57:54 pm »

Nubcnubdo just pointed out a review of the 5.9 liveCD beta1: http://beranger.org/index.php?page=diary&2008/01/03/00/36/53-vectorlinux-5-9-nice-but-
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O'Neill (RE the Asgard): "Usually they ask nicely before they ignore us and do what they damn well please."
http://joe1962.bigbox.info
Running: VL 7 Std 64 + self-cooked XFCE-4.10
lagagnon
Global Moderator
Vectorian
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Posts: 1922



WWW
« Reply #174 on: January 04, 2008, 08:16:48 am »

VL 5.9 gets a pretty good review from this reviewer below and it finds its way to "Linux Today". Not bad:

http://www.linuxtoday.com/news_story.php3?ltsn=2008-01-04-005-26-RV-SW
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"As people become more intelligent they care less for preachers and more for teachers". Robert G. Ingersoll
Joe1962
Administrator
Vectorian
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Posts: 2499



WWW
« Reply #175 on: January 04, 2008, 07:04:43 pm »

Wow, more reviews pouring in:

http://techthroes.blogspot.com/2008/01/first-impressions-vectorlinux-59-mini.html
http://news.softpedia.com/news/Vector-Linux-5-9-GOLD-Edition-Just-Released-74653.shtml
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O'Neill (RE the Asgard): "Usually they ask nicely before they ignore us and do what they damn well please."
http://joe1962.bigbox.info
Running: VL 7 Std 64 + self-cooked XFCE-4.10
exeterdad
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2046



« Reply #176 on: January 04, 2008, 08:41:16 pm »

huh? http://www.linux-watch.com/cgi-bin/board/UltraBoard.pl?Action=ShowPost&Board=talkbacks&Post=391&Idle=0&Sort=0&Order=Descend&Page=0&Session=
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M0E-lnx
Administrator
Vectorian
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Posts: 3195



« Reply #177 on: January 04, 2008, 08:53:54 pm »


I saw that at some place and wondered if it was legit or not
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GrannyGeek
Packager
Vectorian
****
Posts: 2567


« Reply #178 on: January 04, 2008, 10:55:09 pm »

I think the GREEN means that VectorLinux can keep computers out of landfills because it can get maximum performance out of old hardware. It's just the same good old (new) VL 5.9 Standard GOLD.
--GrannyGeek
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Registered Linux User #397786

Happily running VL 7 Gold on  a Sempron LE-1300 desktop (2.3 GHz), 4 G RAM,  GeForce 6150 SE onboard graphics and on an HP Pavilion dv7 i7, 6 gigs, Intel 2nd Generation Integrated Graphics Controller
metvas
Vectorite
***
Posts: 311


« Reply #179 on: January 05, 2008, 12:31:30 pm »

Hi All:
This was the header in the release announcement I made at Linux Today. It is legit. Our cover for the CD has been revamped to GREEN from blue and gold. I will have copies shortly and can post for anyone wishing to see it. Let me know if you are interested.
Regards
Darrell
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