Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  


Visit our home page for VL info. For support and documentation, visit the Vector Linux Knowledge Center or search the Knowledge Center and this Forum using the search box above.

Author Topic: all new math articles by me  (Read 1972 times)

Triarius Fidelis

  • Vecteloper
  • Vectorian
  • ****
  • Posts: 2399
  • Domine, exaudi vocem meam
    • my website
all new math articles by me
« on: August 14, 2008, 12:16:43 am »

PlanetMath is mostly graduate level and I'm not all there yet, plus it has a few pricks, so all my new math articles are on

Here's my contribution thus far

De Morgan's laws
Dijkstra's algorithm (reasonably complete, I just have to change a few things ... it's still way better than my PlanetMath article on the same)
Prim's algorithm
Proof of Prim's algorithm
Uniform cost search

My interests' applicability to artificial intelligence is very fortunate. I should add something on probability this week. :) Plus I want to get the Ford-Fulkerson algorithm out of the way since learning about network flows is kind of a nightmare.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2008, 12:19:26 am by Epic Fail Guy »
"Leatherface, you BITCH! Ho Chi Minh, hah hah hah!"

Formerly known as "Epic Fail Guy" and "Döden" in recent months

Colonel Panic

  • Vectorian
  • ****
  • Posts: 526
Re: all new math articles by me
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2009, 02:48:43 pm »

These look interesting. I got a pretty mediocre pass in my Pure Maths option at uni (I studied it for three years), but I still keep an interest in the subject. The trouble is though that studying mathematical topics can be very demanding and time-consuming so I tend to limit it quite severely and perhaps look at recreational maths books and topics rather than anything too "heavy."

Here's a forum I belong to and sometimes browse;

Tetration is the next mathematical operation in the series which starts with addition, multiplication and exponentiation. The mathematics concerning how it behaves, though, haven't been worked out to a conclusive result as of yet so it's still an interesting topic.

What I can say though is that the numbers get big very quickly! For example, 3t3 = 3^(3^3)
=3^27 which is about 7.62559748 × 10^12.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2009, 12:42:40 am by Colonel Panic »